anomaly

(redirected from Anomoly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

anomaly

1. Astronomy
a. the angle between a planet, the sun, and the previous perihelion of the planet
b. the angle between the periapsis of a particular point on a circle round the orbit as seen from the centre of the orbit. This point is obtained by producing a perpendicular to the major axis of the ellipse through the orbiting body until it reaches the circumference of the circle
c. the angle between the periapsis of an orbit and the position of an imaginary body orbiting at a constant angular speed and in the same period as the real orbiting body
2. Geology
a. a deviation from the normal value of gravity at the earth's surface, caused by density differences at depth, for example those caused by a buried mineral body
b. a magnetic field, for example one produced by a buried mineral body, that deviates from an expected or standard value, usually that of the earth's magnetic field
Anomalyclick for a larger image
Anomaly

anomaly

Any of three related angles by means of which the position, at a particular time, of a body moving in an elliptical orbit can be calculated. For a body S moving around the focus, F, of an orbit (see illustration), the true anomaly is the angle v made by the body, the focus, and the point, P, of nearest approach. For a body orbiting the Sun, P is the perihelion. The angle is measured in the direction of motion of S. If an auxiliary circle is drawn centered on the midpoint, C, of the major axis of the elliptical orbit, then the eccentric anomaly is the angle E between CS′ and CP, where S′ lies on the circle and is vertically above S. The mean anomaly is the angle M between P, F, and a hypothetical body moving at a constant angular speed equal to the mean motion of S. It is thus the product of the mean motion and the time interval since S passed P.

The eccentric and mean anomalies are related by Kepler's equation:

E e sinE = M

where e is the eccentricity of the orbit. The coordinates (x , y) of the body S can be found from the equations

x = a (cosE e )

y = a sinE √(1 – e 2)

where a is the semimajor axis of the orbit. See also equation of center; orbital elements.

anomaly

[ə′näm·ə·lē]
(astronomy)
In celestial mechanics, the angle between the radius vector to an orbiting body from its primary (the focus of the orbital ellipse) and the line of apsides of the orbit, measured in the direction of travel, from the point of closest approach to the primary (perifocus). Also known as true anomaly.
(biology)
An abnormal deviation from the characteristic form of a group.
(geology)
A local deviation from the general geological properties of a region.
(medicine)
Any part of the body that is abnormal in its position, form, or structure.
(meteorology)
The deviation of the value of an element (especially temperature) from its mean value over some specified interval.
(oceanography)
The difference between conditions actually observed at a serial station and those that would have existed had the water all been of a given arbitrary temperature and salinity.
(science and technology)
A deviation beyond normal variations.

anomaly

Abnormality or deviation. Pronounced "uh-nom-uh-lee," it is a favorite word among computer people when complex systems produce output that is inexplicable. See software conflict and anomaly detection.
References in periodicals archive ?
(An anomoly exists for married NRAs who are residents of Mexico, Canada, Japan or Korea.
Scotland presents an anomoly to his English ears, one that ultimately places in question England's own narrative of national development:
Preliminary exploration work at the company's properties in the Wahnapitae Anomoly area is also expected to continue, although Laine admits that there are several problems associated with the properties.
The recent report of a specimen of Sigmodon ochrognathus from the Guadalupe Mountains of northern Culberson County (Hollander et al., 1990) at first appears to be an anomoly. The record comes from an area where previous extensive collecting (most recently by Genoways et al., 1979) had not produced yellow-nosed cotton rats.
In the discussion of monetary and fiscal performance an anomoly arises with respect to the role of non-bank domestic finance and the definition of money supply.
Hip Hip Hooray has been beaten in sellers but sprung a 14-1 surprise from out of the handicap in the first division of the 7f race and trainer Luke Dace explained the anomoly.