multiverse

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multiverse

(mul -ti-verss) A speculative concept that the Universe we inhabit is not unique but is merely one of a very large number of Universes, which can have completely different physical laws and possibly even a different number of space–time dimensions. The multiverse concept emerged in the last few years of the 20th century due to the combination of the observation that ‘fine tuning’ of the basic physical laws is necessary for life to exist in the Universe and the realization that the collapse of stars to black holes and the emergence of ‘baby Universes' sprouting into existence in inflation theory may allow other Universes to come into existence. There is no experimental or observational support for the multiverse concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
As for the cyclic model wherein another universe resides next to ours in another spatial dimension, it relies on two universes being so perfectly aligned and calibrated with each other that they always bounce straight out and straight back, which would seem to be miraculous unto itself and logically require the fine-tuning of a creator being.
The test around which the most excitement seems to spring is one that is trying to find evidence of another universe bumping into our own by examining what's called the Cosmic Microwave Background (essentially microwave radiation that is still hitting Earth as a result of the big bang).