bottom water

(redirected from Antarctic Bottom Water)
Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

bottom water

[′bäd·əm ‚wȯd·ər]
(hydrology)
Water lying beneath oil or gas in productive formations.
(oceanography)
The water mass at the deepest part of a water column in the ocean.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the greenhouse effect could alter the amount of Antarctic bottom water supplied to the world's oceans, expedition researchers will also try to determine the rate at which bottom water leaves the Weddell.
They found that Antarctic Bottom Water has been disappearing at an average rate of about 8 million metric tons per second over the past few decades, equivalent to about 50 times the average flow of the Mississippi River, according to statement from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which helped fund the data collection.
In every oceanographic survey repeated around the Southern Ocean since about the 1980s, Antarctic Bottom Water has been shrinking at a similar mean rate, giving us confidence that this surprisingly large contraction is robust," said lead author of the study Sarah Purkey, a graduate student at the University of Washington in Seattle.
The two deeper layers represent the lower and upper Antarctic Bottom Water (Antarctic Bottom Water is a cold, fresh water mass that originates near Antarctica and flows into the Brazil Basin from the south); the shallowest layer represents the upper ocean.
We know that Antarctic Bottom Water is formed at very high latitudes in the southern oceans and spreads northward, passing through the Brazil Basin into the North Atlantic.
Oceanographers have noticed that Antarctic Bottom Waters, a massive current of cold, salty and dense water that flows 2,000 meters under the ocean's surface from near the Antarctic coast toward the equator has been shrinking in recent decades.