Antarctic Circumpolar Current


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Antarctic Circumpolar Current

[‚ant′ärd·ik ‚sər·kəm′pōl·ər ′kər·ənt]
(oceanography)
The ocean current flowing from west to east through all the oceans around the Antarctic Continent. Also known as West Wind Drift.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Antarctic Circumpolar Current as a diversification trigger for deep-sea octocorals.
Ecology and biogeochemistry of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current during austral spring: a summary of Southern Ocean JGOFS cruise ANT X/6 of R.
On the meridional extent and fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.
Ecological importance of the Southern Boundary of the Antarctic circumpolar current.
The marine ecosystem surrounding Antarctica includes the coastal and continental shelf region that is influenced by seasonal sea ice cover, as well as the permanently open ocean zone poleward of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (Treguer and Jacques 1992).
What we have found is that the evolution of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current influenced global ocean circulation much earlier than previous studies have shown," said Katz, who is assistant professor of earth and environmental science at Rensselaer.
The origin of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current is the wind from the west, and in the English language it is often called West-Wind Drift.
OFF the southern tip of South America, a jet of cold water branches off the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which loops in a continuous eastward-flowing cycle in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica.
Their analysis of satellite-derived ocean height and temperature measurements revealed undulations in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, a body of water that circles eastward between Antarctica and the Indian, Pacific and Indian oceans.
Washington, May 27 (ANI): A new study has provided some of the strongest evidence to date that the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) played a key role in the shifting of tropical, greenhouse climate of the Eocene to modern and much cooler climates.
However, a growing concentration of the isotope 13C in the air during the last de-glaciation indicates that this carbon from decomposition of organisms was released from the southern polar waters, where the Antarctic Circumpolar Current transports more water than any other current in the world.

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