antebellum

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Related to Antebellum South: Antebellum Period

antebellum

Dating before or existing before the US Civil War (1861–1865).
References in periodicals archive ?
In her 2016 book, Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, Sarah L.
Williams defined Intellectual Manhood as a "unique framework within which to understand southern collegians, but also power, class, and culture in the antebellum south" (p.
While there are sections that touch on other historiographies without fully engaging them, for instance when, in a lengthy discussion of the domestication of Judaism in the antebellum South there is surprisingly little discussion of the broader context of the feminizing of Christianity during the Second Great Awakening.
The Origins of Proslavery Christianity: White and Black in Colonial and Antebellum South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.
West's study as a whole would be very valuable reading in undergraduate and graduate courses that examine race relations in the antebellum South, concepts of slavery and freedom, or family history.
In tact, American Catholics were more numerous, influential, and accepted in the antebellum South than in the North, and American Catholics North and South tended to deplore abolitionists, who were mostly fanatical ex-Protestant Unitarians.
"Holly Springs was once a cultural, legal, and business capital in this part of the antebellum South," says Sarah Miller Taylor, vice president of the Holly Springs Garden Club, the event's sponsoring organization.
Furthermore, Afro-Christianity provided social identity and cultural cohesion for slaves throughout the antebellum South.
House Bill 1070 establishes the equivalent of South Africa's pass laws, or more familiar in our history, the Slave Codes of the antebellum South: any white has the right to detain a black person on suspicion, and blacks must carry travel passes or emancipation papers.
Her dislocated figures--room-sized tableaux of black cut-paper silhouettes that alternately lull and startle us--are drawn from a format that was popular in the 18th and 19th centuries as "women's art." In these times, her intense high-art/low-art narratives about racism, sexism and miscegenation in the antebellum South stir up derision as well as praise, because, as some critics claim, she doesn't update her imagery.
Welfare and Charity in the Antebellum South. By Timothy James Lockley (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2007.
Alford is the author of the award winning book Prince Among Slaves (1978), the celebrated story of an African royal enslaved in the antebellum South. The book was turned into a documentary shown on PBS in 2008 that attracted a national audience of more than 3 million viewers.