Antecedent Valley

antecedent valley

[‚ant·ə′sēd·ənt ′val·ē]
(geology)
A stream valley that existed before uplift, faulting, or folding occurred and which has maintained itself during and after these events.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Antecedent Valley

 

a river valley that cuts across an increasing elevation and in terms of geological age is older than that elevation. Antecedent valleys arise when a portion of the earth’s surface on which a river network has formed is uplifted and the rate of the river’s erosion exceeds the rate of the uplifting. The proof of such origin is the unique flexure of the river terraces, which reach a maximum in the axial part of the uplift. Antecedent valleys are narrow and rather deep and have steep slopes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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