Antennagate

Antennagate

The name Apple founder Steve Jobs gave to the controversy over the iPhone 4's antenna after initial users complained of dropped calls and Consumer Reports would not recommend it. Normally, antennas are inside the phone and insulated from the user's hand. In order to make more room inside, the iPhone 4's antennas are fashioned into the metal rim around the unit. However, touching the rim where two antennas meet may significantly interfere with the signal. Some antenna engineers derided the design, saying human hands and antennas should never touch, while others praised its innovative architecture for saving space inside. See iPhone 4.


Lower Left Side
Bridging the gap between the two antennas on the lower left side could lower the signal. Apple offered users a "bumper case" that surrounds the unit to alleviate the problem.
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This issue was dubbed as antennagate during that time.
The company also suffered from "antennagate" and "bendgate"-the former was about iPhone 4 reception problems and the latter was about iPhone 6 devices bending when under certain amounts of pressure.
AntennaGate scandal surrounding the iPhone 4 launch.
TEHRAN (FNA)- First there was the iPhone 4 Antennagate. Then there was the iPhone 5 Scuffgate.
"Bendgate," as the issue has already been dubbed on social-media sites, is a reminder of 2010's "antennagate," when iPhone 4 users reported a design flaw that caused dropped calls.
The company has made similar moves in the past, such as in July 2010 when itrevised the iPhone 4′s signal strength meterduring the brouhaha that then-CEO Steve Jobs called"Antennagate."
Knives out: Nokia and RIM hit back at Apple's 'antennagate' antics
The last time Apple was embroiled in publicity woes was in July last year after the launch of the iPhone 4, when reports about bad reception snowballed and the firm had to call a news conference to address the issue, dubbed "antennagate."
Almost within moments, Apple's chairman and chief executive, Steve Jobs, held a press conference in response to the crisis that would inevitably be called "antennagate".
"The record performance came despite 'Antennagate,' the name used to describe the controversy around alleged iPhone reception problems, in July." Global mobile phone sales surged 14.6 per cent to 340.5 million units in the third quarter from a year earlier, driven mainly by the strong appetite for smartphones, IDC said.
extent of the problem--a situation the media dubbed "antennagate."
How about Apple's fiasco with the iPhone 4, which had antenna reception problems ("Antennagate") when held a certain way?