Anthony the Great

(redirected from Anthony of the Desert)

Anthony the Great

 

Born circa 250; died 356. Founder of monasticism in Egypt.

Anthony lived as a hermit in the desert and was canonized by the Christian church. Several letters by him have been preserved, and the so-called Rules of St. Anthony are attributed to him; his authorship, however, is doubtful. The Life of Anthony, written by Athanasius of Alexandria, aimed at creating the ideal image of a Christian ascetic and became the model for Greek hagiography. The story of Anthony’s temptations in the desert has often served as a subject of painting and literature—for example, Flaubert’s The Temptation of St. Anthony.

References in periodicals archive ?
Anthony of the Desert, as he's best known, kick-started the monastic movement in the third century by fleeing to the wilderness after ridding himself of the horror of an early inheritance.
Anthony of the Desert, choose to leave everything behind, Paul said that for some at home with an aged relative or caring for a disabled child, "life has a way of parachuting them into the desert.
Staying with Jesus has resulted in the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas, the Divine Comedy of Dante, the Cologne Cathedral, the life of Saint Anthony of the Desert, the silence and suffering of Saint John of the Cross, and the radical nonviolence of Catholic Worker cofounder Dorothy Day.