Bacillus anthracis

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Related to Anthracis: Anthrax disease, woolsorters disease

Bacillus anthracis

[bə¦sil·əs ‚an′thrak·əs]
(microbiology)
A gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium that is the causative agent of anthrax; its spores can remain viable for many years in soil, water, and animal hides and products.
References in periodicals archive ?
anthracis was sent to Osan Air Base from the Dugway Proving Ground shipment for research, and 22 DoD personnel were exposed to the sample.
Many species of animals can be infected with Bacillus anthracis either natural or experimentally.
Clinical importance of Bacillus anthracis cannot be denied, not only due to the fact that Anthrax, the disease it produces, may affect all the mammals, including human beings; but also due to the incidence related to deliberate intent of dissemination of the disease agent (Mebane et al.
anthracis spores due to the strict control and use of MeBr.
anthracis in ultra-low resource environments: BaDx (Bacillus anthracis diagnostics).
anthracis toxin and capsule genes as reported elsewhere [17-20].
anthracis (the bacterium that causes anthrax) and the lei gene of Salmonella
anthracis differs from its near neighbor Bacillus cereus by an SNP in the gyrA gene (GenBank accession nos.
The researchers used Bacillus atrophaeus, a close cousin of the anthrax-causing organism, Bacillus anthracis, that is commonly found in the environment.
Commercially available hand-held immunoassays (HHAs) for the detection of Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis (the causative agents of anthrax and plague, respectively) were compared for sensitivity, specificity, repeatability, robustness, and stability.