anthropic principle


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anthropic principle

(an-throp -ik) A principle that was put forward in the 1960s by R. Dicke and maintains that the presence of life in the Universe places constraints on the ways in which the very early Universe evolved: the possible initial conditions are limited to those that give rise to an inhabited Universe, i.e. what we observe must be restricted by the conditions necessary for our presence as observers.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

anthropic principle

[an′thräp·ik ′prin·sə·pəl]
(astronomy)
The assertion that the presence of intelligent life on earth places limits on the many ways the universe could have developed and could have caused the conditions of temperature that prevail today.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Tipler, Frank J., The Cosmological Anthropic Principle, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1986 (Issued with correction as an Oxford University Press Paperback in 1988).
But because the anthropic principle in any form makes few, if any, testable predictions, its value will likely forever remain obscure.
In order to avoid questions about how these properties became so finely tuned, the anthropic principle is combined with the idea that our universe is part of a multiverse, in which each universe has randomly determined properties.
Believers of the so-called "anthropic principle" hold that the world was preplanned and designed for sentient beings.
"Large number coincidences and the anthropic principle in cosmology." in M.
Krauss, author of Hiding in the Mirror, refers to the Anthropic Principle as "the last refuge of scoundrels."
Explaining the Anthropic Principle, physicist Professor Nathan Aviezer argues that the improbability of the chain of events that created the complex conditions needed for human life to develop is so high that it points to a guiding hand.
(22) "The anthropic principle has hit the limelight because the boundary conditions it places upon the universe are extremely restrictive.
Thus (and here we are, back in the material world), as physics suggests in that anthropic principle, consciousness seems--no doubt merely seems embedded in the fabric of the universe.
Woit has only harsh things to say about the recent acceptance of an anthropic principle by several leading string theorists, notably Weinberg and David Susskind.
One of the most striking examples of the anthropic principle is the cosmological constant, a number that measures the amount of cosmic repulsion caused by the energy in empty space (Carroll and Press 1992).
After presenting views for and against a teleological explanation of the universe Golshani concludes by saying "there are some clues to the teleological aspects of our universe in modern science." He gives the example of "anthropic principle" which may be interpreted to mean "God planned the universe with human beings in mind" (p.