Anthropocene epoch


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Anthropocene epoch:

see Holocene epochHolocene epoch
or Recent epoch,
most recent of all subdivisions of geologic time, ranging from the present back to the time (c.11,000 years ago) of almost complete withdrawal of the glaciers of the preceding Pleistocene epoch.
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(1) Jan Zalasiewicz et al., "Making the Case for a Formal Anthropocene Epoch," Newsletters on Stratigraphy 50.2 (April 2017): 205-26 (214).
Indeed, in this era of significant human impact on the environment - what some call the Anthropocene epoch - species and spaces need all the help they can get to retain their autonomy.
What I hope to have shown with these examples is that literature, like the humanities, is outpouring with works that warn, ponder on, and speculate what is happening and what might happen if we continue to overlook the practices that have led the world to enter (according to human parameters, of course) the Anthropocene Epoch. Geologists will continue on dealing with and analyzing rocks.
Does the Anthropocene Epoch demand an anthropocentric environmental ethics?
A research group proposes that the Holocene has ended and that we are now living in the Anthropocene Epoch, in which humans are a dominant force on the planet, source: geological society of America Cenozoic Era Epoch Paleocene 66.0 Eocene 56.0 Oligocene 33.9 Miocene 23.0 Pliocene 5.3 Pleistocene 2.6 Holocene 0.01 Anthropocene 1950s
There is nothing practical about the decision to formalize the Anthropocene Epoch. Any geologists, human or alien, studying our time millions of years from now will not care about our nomenclature.
Last year, Simon Lewis and myself (Mark) wrote a review paper in Nature on defining the Anthropocene epoch. The radical suggestion was that it began in 1610, after the irreversible exchange of species between the New and Old Worlds following the 1492 arrival of Europeans in the Americas.