Anthropogenic Soils

Anthropogenic Soils

 

soils originating as a result of human activity. They may be created deliberately, as in the cases of gardening soils, potting soils, and hothouse soils, or inadvertently, as in the case of the soils on the terraces of mines. Some writers also consider greatly improved soils (for example, in irrigated or drained lands) to be anthropogenic.

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According to Yaalon [18] Mediterranean soils would be part of the anthropogenic soils of the planet.
for comparison with agricultural or anthropogenic soils of similar texture and mineralogy, or for comparison with other native soils of different texture, mineralogy or pedogenesis in the region (e.
Black carbon in density fractions of anthropogenic soils of the brazilian amazon region.
Her perspectives are historical ecology and archaeological landscapes, moving earth and managing water, land of the ancestors, the cultural geography of anthropogenic soils, and territoriality and memory.
2002) showed that carbonised materials, such as biochars, are responsible for maintaining high levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and available nutrients in anthropogenic soils such as Amazonian Dark Earth (or Terra Preta).
Total and partial analyses of stream sediments and alluvial and anthropogenic soils were performed using standardized methods of analyses or the approach published in Sutherland (2002).
Alluvial soils of the Smolnik Creek catchment and anthropogenic soils covering mine waste were also studied.
High fertility associated with the anthropogenic soils, terra preta, in the Amazon has been related to the high content of organic carbon in the form of char and the practice of 'slash and char' by the pre-Columbian indigenous people of the Amazon (Glaser et al.
Detailed studies of these pre-colonial anthropogenic soils can help answer questions about pre-Colombian societies that inhabited the Amazon Valley and its main tributaries between 2400 [+ or -] 75 and 1525 [+ or -] 58 years BP.