Anti-Lebanon

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Anti-Lebanon,

ancient Anti-Libanus, Arabic Jabal al Sharqi, mountain range between Syria and Lebanon, rising to Mt. Hermon, 9,232 ft (2,814 m) high. Once noted for its forests of oak, pine, cypress, and juniper, the range is largely barren and stony. Its name also appears as Anti-Liban.
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Anti-Lebanon

a mountain range running north and south between Syria and Lebanon, east of the Lebanon Mountains. Highest peak: Mount Hermon, 2814 m (9232 ft.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
For the Kataeb Party there are two main substitutes for the garbage plan -- using a remote piece of land in the Anti-Lebanon Mountains and decentralizing waste management.
Summary: "I solemnly proclaim the state of Greater Lebanon and in the name of the French Republic; I recognize its sovereignty and extent from the Al-Kbir River to the borders of Palestine and the summits of the Anti-Lebanon mountains."
The ultimate consequence could be a protracted presence of radical extremists who have redeployed to the Anti-Lebanon mountains.
However, some believe that the harsh winter weather, which will blanket the eastern Anti-Lebanon Mountains in snow, may actually reduce the amount of fighting on the border.
Sam Small, ejected over the Anti-Lebanon Mountains. They landed in the Western Bek where they were set upon by a crowd of excited Lebanese who believed them to be Israelis, before they handed them over to the authorities.
"The Bekaa Valley is a beautiful place [for wine]," says Derenoncourt of the alluvial plateau resting between Mount Lebanon and the Anti-Lebanon mountains atop a bed of limestone.
At the northern edge of the Bekaa Valley, hemmed in by Mount Lebanon and the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west and east, 20 Lebanese families in Qasr, a border town meters from Syria, live as refugees.
Above the black silhouette of the Anti-Lebanon mountains, Jupiter shone with spotlight intensity, dominating the fainter stars dusting the night sky.
Before the uprising erupted in Syria in mid-March, relations were cordial between the Syrian soldiers billeted on the mountain tops and the impoverished farming communities strung along the foot of the Anti-Lebanon mountains north of Anjar.