vasopressin

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Related to Anti-diuretic hormone: diabetes insipidus, antidiuretic hormone deficiency

vasopressin

(văz'ōprĕs`ĭn): see antidiuretic hormoneantidiuretic hormone
, polypeptide hormone secreted by the posterior pituitary gland. Its principal action is to regulate the amount of water excreted by the kidneys. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH), known also as vasopressin, causes the kidneys to resorb water directly from the
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vasopressin

 

a hormone secreted by the posterior lobe of the hypophysis; causes constriction of vessels (acting on the smooth muscles of their walls) and increased blood pressure (pressor effect); also maintains at a proper level the reverse absorption of water in the straight tubules of the kidneys, that is, decreases the quantity of urine discharged (antidiuretic effect). Vasopressin is formed in the neurosecretory cells of the anterior nuclei of the hypothalmus, from which it enters the hypophysis along the nerve fibers. The antidiuretic action of the hormone is one of the factors that maintain the relative constancy of the water-salt metabolism in the bodies of vertebrate animals and man. A deficiency of vasopressin may lead to diabetes insipidus, in which discharge of urine is sharply increased. Vasopressin is contained in preparations obtained from the posterior hypophysis—Pituitrin and adiurekrin. Chemically, vasopressin is an octapeptide constructed of eight amino acids (in the majority of animals and in humans vasopressin consists of cysteine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, glutamine, asparagin, proline, arginine, and glycine; in pigs lysine is found instead of arginine). In structure and effect vasopressin is similar to another hormone of the hypophysis—oxytocin.

G. N. KASSIL’

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

vasopressin

[‚vā·zō′pres·ən]
(biochemistry)
A peptide hormone which is elaborated by the posterior pituitary and which has a pressor effect; used medicinally as an antidiuretic. Also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anti-diuretic factor in the urine of children with nutritional oedema: Nutritional oedema is associated with an increased secretion of an anti-diuretic substance (probably anti-diuretic hormone) which prevents the normal excretory response to water administration.
Instead, some of the most common causes of bedwetting include genetic factors, lack of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) or vasopressin, which is produced normally at night to limit the formation of urine during sleep.
At this stage, the low serum sodium and osmolality together with high urinary sodium and osmolality suggested that anti-diuretic hormone activity was present.
Other reasons could include having a small bladder capacity or producing less anti-diuretic hormone (this affects the amount of urine made by the body, so if you have less of the hormone you make more urine).
* An anti-diuretic hormone is sent to the kidneys to limit the volume of urine produced.
The pituitary secretes growth hormone (GH), prolactin, corticotrophin, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, thyrotropin, and anti-diuretic hormone (Rang & Dale, 1991).

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