antiaromatic

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antiaromatic

[‚an·tē‚ar·ə′mad·ik]
(chemistry)
A cyclic compound with delocalized electrons that does not obey Hückel's rule, and is much less stable than similar nonaromatic compounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following topics are covered: tracking aromaticity and antiaromaticity based on n-DIs, applications of n- DIs, and multicenter electron delocalization in all-metal compounds.
The last example of the synthesis of a simple, stable molecule with the electronic configuration of antiaromaticity -- cyclooctatetraene -- was in 1913.
The 14 chapters of part one discuss topics such as the physical properties and theoretical studies of cyclobutane; antiaromaticity and aromaticity in carbocyclic four-membered rings; thermochemistry of cyclobutane and its derivatives; NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy of cyclobutanes; conformation and configuration as stereochemical aspects of cyclobutane; synthesis of cyclobutanes; the application of cyclobutane derivatives in organic synthesis; structural effects of the cyclobutyl group on reactivity and properties; cation radicals in the synthesis and reactions of cyclobutanes; and highly unsaturated cyclobutane derivatives.