digoxin

(redirected from Antiarrhythmic drugs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

digoxin:

see digitalisdigitalis
, any of several chemically similar drugs used primarily to increase the force and rate of heart contractions, especially in damaged heart muscle. The effects of the drug were known as early as 1500 B.C.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

digoxin

[dī′gäk·sən]
(organic chemistry)
C41H64O14 A crystalline steroid obtained from a foxglove leaf (Digitalis lanata); similar to digitalis in pharmacological effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
CACAF involved 137 patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF refractory to two or more different antiarrhythmic agents who were randomized to catheter ablation plus antiarrhythmic drug therapy or antiarrhythmic drug therapy alone.
And while ablation may not have the side effects of antiarrhythmic drugs, the procedure carries a small risk of bleeding and stroke (about 1 percent), Dr.
Kowey, who has served as a consultant to numerous pharmaceutical companies interested in developing antiarrhythmic drugs.
Physicians tend to think of ablation and antiarrhythmic drug therapy as separate treatments, but "there can be synergies between the two," Dr.
Section One comprehensively reviews basic cardiac electrophysiology, the mechanisms responsible for arrhythmias in the setting of ischemia, and basic pharmacology of antiarrhythmic drugs.
This is a far more attractive option than dithering around with one antiarrhythmic drug after another.
For those patients who had reached six months, 7/7 (100%) patients experienced normal sinus rhythm without antiarrhythmic drugs.
This agent acts by blocking both rapid and slow potassium channels in myocardium, and is chemically distinct from other class III antiarrhythmic drugs like sotalol, amiodarone, and dofetilide.
Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are more effective than antiarrhythmic drugs in preventing arrhythmic cardiac death, but they do not affect rates of death from other cardiac causes.
A diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is usually followed by a course of treatment involving antiarrhythmic drugs designed to keep the heart's electrical system under control.
BOSTON -- Catheter ablation is superior to an assortment of antiarrhythmic drugs in the treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who have previously failed at least one AAD, according to a new study.
American Heart Association guidelines call antiarrhythmic drugs "acceptable, probably helpful" for ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia that persists after three or more shocks from an external defibrillator.