Antietam campaign

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Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Antietam campaign

(ăntē`təm), Sept., 1862, of the Civil War. After the second battle of Bull RunBull Run,
small stream, NE Va., c.30 mi (50 km) SW of Washington, D.C. Two important battles of the Civil War were fought there: the first on July 21, 1861, and the second Aug. 29–30, 1862. Both battlefields are included in Manassas National Battlefield Park (est. 1940).
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, Gen. Robert E. LeeLee, Robert Edward,
1807–70, general in chief of the Confederate armies in the American Civil War, b. Jan. 19, 1807, at Stratford, Westmoreland co., Va.; son of Henry ("Light-Horse Harry") Lee.
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 crossed the Potomac to invade Maryland and Pennsylvania. At Frederick, Md., he divided (Sept. 10) his army, sending Stonewall Jackson to capture the large Union garrison at Harpers Ferry and thus clear his communications through the Shenandoah valley. With the remainder, Lee marched NW toward Hagerstown. Gen. George B. McClellanMcClellan, George Brinton,
1826–85, Union general in the American Civil War, b. Philadelphia. After graduating (1846) from West Point, he served with distinction in the Mexican War and later worked on various engineering projects, notably on the survey (1853–54) for
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 learned of this division of forces and moved to attack. In the battle on South Mt. (the Blue Ridge N of the Potomac, 12 mi/19 km W of Frederick) on Sept. 14, 1862, McClellan defeated Lee's rear guard and took the passes of that range. Lee then fell back to Sharpsburg (c.9 mi/14.5 km W of South Mt.), where his position lay behind Antietam Creek. On Sept. 15 the Harpers Ferry garrison capitulated to Jackson, who, with part of his command, joined Lee before McClellan attacked. The battle of Antietam (or Sharpsburg) opened on the morning of Sept. 17. Early assaults on Lee's left were bloody but indecisive, and McClellan failed to press the slight Union advantage with his available reserves. In the afternoon Burnside's corps crossed the Antietam over the bridge on Lee's right and drove the Confederates back, but A. P. Hill's division arrived from Harpers Ferry and repulsed the attack. The battle was not renewed. On Sept. 18–19, Lee recrossed the Potomac into Virginia unhindered. The fighting at Antietam was so fierce that Sept. 17, 1862, is said to have been the bloodiest single day of the war with some 23,000 dead and wounded, evenly divided between the sides. It was a Union victory only in the sense that Lee's invasion was stopped. McClellan has been blamed for not pursuing Lee with his superior forces. The scene of the battle of Antietam has been set aside as a national battlefield (est. 1890; see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
, table). The battle influenced Lincoln's decisions to remove McClellan and to deliver a preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Bibliography

See K. P. Williams, Lincoln Finds a General (Vol. II, 1950); J. V. Murfin, The Gleam of Bayonets (1965); W. A. Frassunito, Antietam: The Photographic Legacy of America's Bloodiest Day (1978); S. W. Sears, Landscape Turned Red (1988).

References in periodicals archive ?
The line was under direct threat by invading Confederates during the Antietam Campaign, and the following summer suffered serious damage during the Gettysburg Campaign.
Many of the sites are part of the popular Civil War Trails program and have accessible interpretive markers, they say, and The Civil War Trails guide brochure "Antietam Campaign: Lee Invades Maryland" would be a helpful accessory.
Slotkin argues that the Antietam campaign was the result of decisions made by Abraham Lincoln and by Jefferson Davis in response to what they perceived to be the failure to achieve victory.
Among his topics are one Irish brigadier, Charles Whilden and the First South Carolina, civilians and the Antietam campaign, women spies, and the life and times of Louisa May Alcott.
Any mention of Sears' name brings to mind Landscape Turned Red, his excellent book on the Antietam campaign, but as an introduction to Gettysburg let me recommend readers seek out his most recent book, Chancellorsville.
* Ernst, Kathleen, Too Afraid to Cry: Maryland Civilians in the Antietam Campaign (Stackpole Books, 1999).
Blair suggests that the real value of Maryland for the rebel cause came before the Antietam campaign, when the travails of this "occupied" slave state helped to forge a "Confederate identity." Carol Reardon, looking a half-century beyond the bloody conflict, explains what lessons the U.S.
Thomas Fleming's account of George Washington as a commander, Williamson Murray's discussion of 'What Took the North So Long?' to defeat the South in 1861-5, John Bowers' account of 'The Stonewall Enigma', Stephen Sears on the 'Lost Order' that determined the course of the Antietam Campaign in 1862, and James M.
Sandwiched between, and often obscured by, the Seven Days battles and the Antietam campaign, Confederate activities during Second Manassas come into sharp focus for the first time in Hennessy's text.[1] Hennessy contends that Lee, aware of political turmoil in the North and opportunities for recognition from Britain and France, designed his strategy "with the specific objective of opening the way for a raid into Maryland" (p.
Principal battles and campaigns: Peninsula campaign, Bull Run II campaign (Manassas, Virginia), Antietam campaign, Fredericksburg (1862), Chancellorsville (near Fredericksburg) (1863); Nashville (1864).
Lee, the Virginia Campaign, the Siege of Petersburg, Abraham Lincoln's civilian corps commanders, federal wing and corps commanders in the Antietam Campaign and Gettysburg Campaign, senior federal commanders in the Fifth Offensive at Petersburg, and revolutionary war relatives of significant civil war soldiers and statesmen.
But to focus an examination of the Antietam Campaign on 17 September, the day of the battle, is in Joseph Harsh's judgment to enter the movie in mid-reel.

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