antifreeze proteins

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antifreeze proteins

[′an·ti‚frēz ¦prō‚tēnz]
(biochemistry)
Proteins that decrease the nonequilibrium freezing point of water without significantly affecting the melting point by directly binding to the surface of an ice crystal, thereby disrupting its normal structure and growth pattern and inhibiting further ice growth; found in a number of fish, insects, and plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team's study presents the first direct measurements of the superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions, according to Celik.
A heat-stable antifreeze protein (AFP) has been isolated from L.
Low temperature extrusion means costly equipment and the crystals tend to grow, conventional stabilizers have only a slight effect and antifreeze protein additives tend to harden the product itself.
Canadian scientists from the Department of Biochemistry at Queens University, in Kingston, Ontario, discovered an antifreeze protein in snow fleas that may increase the shelf life of human organs for transplantation.
Called AFP, or antifreeze protein, the molecule directs ice-crystal formation.
Scientists at Kansai University said Tuesday they have succeeded in efficiently extracting antifreeze protein from pond smelts, allowing for the substance to be used in a wide range of areas such as food and medicine.
The company behind the research, A/F Protein, a Seabright branch, says when its antifreeze protein was introduced into Atlantic salmon, "it resulted in the production of salmon that grow dramatically faster than standard salmon".
Analysis revealed that the antifreeze protein was present in the tomato plants, and that the protein demonstrated recrystallization inhibition activity.
This antifreeze protein and others like it circulate in the blood of many Arctic and Antarctic fish, binding to the surface of ice crystals to prevent them from growing too large.
Davis, CA 95616) are involved in antifreeze protein research.
Cheng had first searched a database of sequenced genes for any similarity to the D NA sequence of the gene for the antifreeze protein.
Yang of the University of Pittsburgh and his colleagues worked with an antifreeze protein -- rich in the amino acid alanine -- isolated from the winter flounder.