antifreeze proteins

antifreeze proteins

[′an·ti‚frēz ¦prō‚tēnz]
(biochemistry)
Proteins that decrease the nonequilibrium freezing point of water without significantly affecting the melting point by directly binding to the surface of an ice crystal, thereby disrupting its normal structure and growth pattern and inhibiting further ice growth; found in a number of fish, insects, and plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The resin systems used in these coatings are modeled on the structures of antifreeze proteins that are known to inhibit the freezing of organisms such as arctic fish, according to Hirayama.
ZHAW's researchers have been investigating the antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possessed by plants, insects and fish and other animals to ensure their survival in the Artie and other areas with subzero temperatures.
Washington, March 4 (ANI): A new study has found that the same antifreeze proteins that keep organisms from freezing in cold environments also can prevent ice from melting at warmer temperatures.
Arctic microorganisms [that] may be useful in bio-remediation of polluted land and water," and "Arctic antifreeze proteins .
Including antifreeze proteins or peptides in ice cream in order to control recrystallization greatly enhances the ability to deliver smoother ice cream to consumers.
They carry antifreeze proteins in their blood and have few red blood cells, as well as having an unusual way of controlling heart rate and blood pressure.
Researchers explain that not only will this protein preserve the organs longer but unlike the antifreeze proteins in beetles and moths, anti-freeze proteins in snow fleas break down and lose their structure at higher temperatures, meaning that if it used to store organs for transplants, they will be cleared from a person's system quickly, reducing the possibility of harmful antibodies forming that could cause a deadly infection.
Researchers discovered these so-called antifreeze proteins in the 1960s (SN: 4/19/97, p.
The antifreeze proteins were found to be up to 100 times more powerful than similar proteins found in fish.
Fish of the Arctic Ocean also have antifreeze proteins.
We're also working on research to infuse antifreeze proteins (AFP2) found in arctic fish into citrus," says Yelenosky.
5,118,792 for antifreeze proteins with specified properties related to the suppression of ice crystal growth.