Antinoüs

(redirected from Antinuous)

Antinoüs

(ăntĭn`ōəs), c.110–130, favorite of Emperor Hadrian, b. Bithynia. He was with the emperor constantly until on a journey in Egypt he was drowned in the Nile—some say in saving Hadrian's life. His beauty was legendary, and Hadrian mourned him greatly, had him deified, founded the city of Antinoöpolis in Egypt in his honor, and seems to have renamed the youth's birthplace Antinoöpolis. A cult was inaugurated in his honor, coins were struck with Antinoüs' head on them, and many busts and statues were made.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authorAEs text is organized in ten parts, focusing on The Torah, ancient Greece and the first sexologists, sexual expression from Alexander the Great to Antinuous, the rise of a new order in the repression of sex in Western society, the medieval war on sin, sex in the Ottoman Empire, the ReformationAEs impact on sexual expression, the impact of the Enlightenment on sexual expression, and modern and post-modern examples of sexual repression.
She still craftily unravels her tapestry night after night to forestall obstreperous suitors, but she also holds her own against threats brought by the suitor Antinuous, asserting her power of independent choice: "My patience wasn't slavery, it was pure trust" (20).