Antiochus

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Related to Antiochus Epiphanes: Maccabees

Antiochus

sexually active with daughter. [Br. Lit.: Pericles]
See: Incest
References in periodicals archive ?
Dimont analyzes the conflict like this: "Antiochus Epiphanes has been so entrenched in Jewish history as a villain that few Jews can see the war that ensued for what it really was--not an uprising against tyrannical Seleucids, but a revolt by Jewish anti-Hellenizers against Jewish Hellenizers." (34) A point that Johnson makes about Jewish rebels in another context is applicable to the Maccabees: They put into practice "the ancient doctrine that Jewish society was a theocracy, acknowledging rule by none but God." (35)
Carson, Maccabee is a historical novelization of mid-2nd century, when a Syrian king called Antiochus Epiphanes sought to exterminate the Jewish nation.
And will Europe's new Antiochus Epiphanes force his way into the Temple and proclaim himself "God"?
Thus we find that Diodorus the Sicilian, who lived in the first century B.C.E., and wrote in his Greek Bibliotheca Historica about the Jews in the time of the Macabbean revolt against Antiochus Epiphanes (174-164 B.C.E.), says that Jewish distinctiveness is a manifestation of their misanthropic hatred of mankind: Now the majority of his friends advised the king to take the city [of Jerusalem] by storm and to wipe out completely the race of the Jews, since they alone of all nations avoided dealings with any other people and looked upon all men as their enemies ...
In the Macchabeans' time a certain Onias, fleeing Antiochus Epiphanes, obtained the command of Ptolemy's armies and had a temple built at Leontopolis in imitation of the one in Jerusalem.
Seow dates the final form of the book to late 164 or early 163 B.C.E., that is, slightly before the death of Antiochus Epiphanes. The third-person tales of chapters 2-6, however, were probably composed as early as the late fourth or early third century.
Antiochus Epiphanes IV issued an edict prohibiting the reading of the Torah and the Jews evaded this proscription by reading a related passage from the prophets.
Most Old Testament scholars agree that this refers to an event that occurred during the invasion of Jerusalem by Antiochus Epiphanes in 167 B.C.E., when he ordered a statue of Zeus set up in the temple and slaughtered a pig on the altar.
The small horn, which uttered blasphemy, was Antiochus Epiphanes, whose headquarters was in Syria and who controlled Palestine.
On the Judean oracle she is right in saving that it could have come out of the context of AD 66-70, but the language of the oracle reflects more the story of Antiochus Epiphanes in 169 BC than any first-century events and could very easily have come out of an earlier context than AD 66-70 (whether AD 39 or the ministry of Jesus); arguably its attribution to Jesus would be more easily understood in that case than if it was a brand new oracle delivered shortly before the writing of Mark.
In 175 BC Antiochus Epiphanes had ascended to the Syrian throne.
Hadrian declared himself successor to Antiochus Epiphanes, the Greek ruler who had tried to destroy Judaism three centuries before, and he erected a monument to Pompey, the first Roman enemy of the Jews.