Antiochus I

Antiochus I

(Antiochus Soter) (āntī`əkəs sō`tər), b. c.324 B.C., d. c.262 or 261 B.C., king of Syria (280–261? B.C.), son of Seleucus ISeleucus I
(Seleucus Nicator) , d. 280 B.C., king of ancient Syria. An able general of Alexander the Great, he played a leading part in the wars of the Diadochi. In the new partition of the empire in 312 B.C. he received Babylonia.
..... Click the link for more information.
. He did not, like his father, seek to expand in Europe. The Seleucid holdings were greatly reduced, particularly by the Egyptians under Ptolemy IIPtolemy II
(Ptolemy Philadelphus) , c.308–246 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (285–246 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, son of Ptolemy I and Berenice (c.340–281 B.C.). He continued his father's efforts to make Alexandria the cultural center of the Greek world.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Antiochus was famous as a founder of cities.
References in periodicals archive ?
355: New information has become available on the land grants by Antiochus I and II thanks to the full publication of the so-called "Lehmann Text" (MMA 86.11.299; CTMMA IV 148), a judicial document dated to 236 BC regarding a land grant by Antiochus II to his wife Laodice and his sons Seleucus (II) and Antiochus (Hierax) (Van der Spek and Wallenfels 2014).
157: Note that the Babylonian chronicles BCHP 5-9 deal with the period in which Antiochus I was crown prince.
One of the sources is the Astronomical diary for the year 273 BC (AD 1 -273B: 29'-33'), where it is reported that the satrap of Bactria had sent twenty elephants to the satrap of Babylonia, to be forwarded to Syria to the king (Antiochus I).
201-4: For new editions of the cylinder of Antiochus I from Borsippa with extensive commentaries see now Stevens 2014 and Stol and Van der Spek online.
298-312: Much controversy has surrounded the dates of the so-called frataraka coins from Persis, some of them overstrikes of coins of Seleucus I and Antiochus I. Plischke advocates a dating of the coins that postdates the middle of the second century BC.
In 62 B.C., King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene built on the mountain top a tomb-sanctuary flanked by huge statues of himself, two lions, two eagles and various Greek, Armenian, and Iranian gods, such as Hercules-Vahagn, Zeus-Aramazd or Oromasdes and Apollo-Mithras.
"Anson 1901" should read "Anson 1985" and "Scott 1085" should read "Scott 1985." In terms of substantive content, a clear chronology emerges alongside succinct profiles of significant individuals such as Seleucus, Antiochus I, Euthydemus, Demetrius, and Eucratides.
Aratus resided at the courts of Antigonus II Gonatas, king of Macedonia, and Antiochus I of Syria.
The editor provides an introduction explaining that the tomb sanctuary built on Mount Nerod in southeast Anatolia, present-day Turkey, was built by King Antiochus I in the first century BCE, that it was discovered in 1881, and that the long-awaited publication of investigations occurred in 1996.
The realm of the evil, incestuous Antiochus is, for instance, something right out of "Arabian Nights," with the decapitated heads of Antiochus' victims strung on a tree like Christmas ornaments.
On the other hand, Kristeller offers an interesting theory about the origin of the view that Platonic forms are ideas in the mind of god: in chapter 8 a cumulative argument is developed to show that Antiochus is the probable author of this synthetic theory.