Antiochus III


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Related to Antiochus III: Antiochus IV, Cleopatra

Antiochus III

(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus IISeleucus II
(Seleucus Callinicus), d. 226 B.C., king of ancient Syria (247–226 B.C.), son of Antiochus II. On his father's death there was a struggle for the throne between Seleucus and his stepmother, Berenice (on behalf of her infant son).
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 and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline. Although Antiochus did not succeed in totally restoring the greatness of the Seleucid dynasty, he did much to revive its glory. He led an expedition (212–205 B.C.) to the eastern provinces and went as far as India. Although he was defeated earlier by the Egyptians at Raphia (modern Rafa), he and Philip VPhilip V,
238–179 B.C., king of Macedon (221–179), son of Demetrius II, successor of Antigonus III. He won fame in a war in Greece (220–217), in which he sided with the Achaean League against the Spartans and the Aetolian League.
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 of Macedon undertook (202 B.C.) to wrest Egyptian territories from the boy king, Ptolemy VPtolemy V
(Ptolemy Epiphanes) , d. 180 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (205–180 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, son of Ptolemy IV. He succeeded to the throne as a small boy, and his reign began with disastrous civil wars.
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. Antiochus did not properly appreciate the growing power of Rome. While Philip V was engaged by the Roman armies, Antiochus recovered S Syria and Asia Minor. In 199 he won a decisive victory over the Egyptians; Palestine then reverted to Syria, having been under Egyptian rule for almost a century. In 196 he seized the Thracian Chersonese and thus alarmed the Greeks. They as well as the Egyptians sought the aid of the Romans. Antiochus, who disregarded the advice of HannibalHannibal
, b. 247 B.C., d. 183 or 182 B.C. Carthaginian general, an implacable and formidable enemy of Rome. Although knowledge of him is based primarily on the reports of his enemies, Hannibal appears to have been both just and merciful. He is renowned for his tactical genius.
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 in 193, waited and then challenged Rome by accepting the invitation of the Aetolian LeagueAetolian League,
confederation centering in the cities of Aetolia. It was formed in the 4th cent. B.C. and began to gain power in the 3d cent. in opposing the Achaean League and the Macedonians.
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 to interfere in Greece in 192. The Romans crushed him (191) at Thermopylae and again at Magnesia (190). He also lost a number of naval engagements, and in 188 he was forced to give up all his territory W of the Taurus. Thus the Seleucid empire became a purely inland Asian state, and dreams of reviving Alexander the Great's empire died.

Antiochus III

known as Antiochus the Great. 242--187 bc, king of Syria (223--187), who greatly extended the Seleucid empire but was forced (190) to surrender most of Asia Minor to the Romans
References in periodicals archive ?
I fear, however, that the focus of the Seleucid kings, despite the anabasis of Antiochus III, gradually shifted to the west, as is nicely demonstrated by Kosmin (2014a: 145-46, maps 5 and 6).
Antiochus III's edict on behalf of Jerusalem upon its capture ca.
Meanwhile, Antiochus III, who ruled over the Seleucid Empire from 223 to 187 B.C., turned to face the Romans, whom he imagined he could easily defeat.
Principal war: war with Antiochus III of Syria (192-188).
The three books in this volume complete his account of the years from 191 to 180, when Rome crushed and shrank the empire of Seleucid ruler Antiochus III and extended and consolidate her mastery over the Hellenistic states.
They cover behavioral aspects of the northern Syria 2007 hoard of Athenian Owls from the Near East; a metallurgical perspective on Athenian tetradrachms from Tel Mikhal; the eras of Pamphylia and the Seleucid invasions of Asia Minor; the Antiochus III hoard; the metrology of Judaean small bronze coins; Severus Alexander, the Temple of Jupiter Ultor, and Jovian iconography on Roman imperial coinage; and a comparative statistical approach to early Byzantine coin circulation in the eastern provinces.
by Antiochus III Megas (222-187) it is said: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Letter 37,9) "...
But then, in 223 BCE, Antiochus III began a vicious campaign to restore all of the original empire of Alexander the Great to Seleucid control.
Cornelius Scipio the Younger (autumn 203); defeated by Scipio and Masinissa at Zama (spring 202); helped to negotiate peace treaty with Rome; elected suffete (196) and promulgated needed reforms and anticorruption measures, but denounced to Rome by his enemies and forced to flee; served Antiochus III the Great of Syria (193-188), for whom he raised and led a small Phoenician fleet against Rhodes (190) but was defeated by Eudamus of Rhodes and L.
The Hellenistic king of Syria, Antiochus III, held his wedding at Zeugma in 221 BC; 150 years later, the Armenian king, Tigranes the Great, ordered the execution of Cleopatra Selene, a Hellenistic princess, there.
Principal wars: Second Punic War (219-202); Syrian War with Antiochus III (192-188).