Antipholus

Antipholus

identically named sons of Aegeon and Emilia. [Br. Lit.: Comedy of Errors]
See: Twins
References in periodicals archive ?
The comedy follows two pairs of identical twins, Antipholus of Syracuse and Antipholus of Ephesus, and their servants, both named Dromio.
Taking place in the city of Ephesus, the plot details the arrival of Antipholus of Syracuse and his servant, Dromio of Syracuse, in what audiences quickly clock as the home town of their identical twin brothers, Antipholus of Ephesus and his servant, Dromio of Ephesus.
This fantastical comedy follows two pairs of identical twins, Antipholus of Syracuse and Antipholus of Ephesus, and their servants, who are both named Dromio.
And that is ironic: To have the brothers, both named Antipholus, and their servants, both named Dromios, inadvertently mix their lives up for a day is already a recipe for all-out hilarity.
The plot revolves around twin brothers separated at birth, both called Antipholus, and twin servants likewise separated and both called Dromio.
Antipholus and Dromio arrive from the neighbouring province of Syracuse but, unknown to them, Ephesus plays host to their identical twin brothers, separated at birth.
Joseph Chance and Dan Wheeler will play the twin Antipholus brothers in The Comedy of Errors, with debutants Matthew McPherson and Will Featherstone as their respective long-suffering twin servants, both called Dromio.
And there are very many moments deftly played for laughs - such as when the prim Luciana necks a large brandy as if it is lemonade during her chat to smitten Antipholus of Syracuse, and when the conjurer Pinch appears as an American preacher with a touch of Elvis and lots of dry ice.
Into this run-down piazza come Antipholus of Syracuse and his manservant, Dromio of Syracuse, baffling those familiar with the strangers' resident lookalikes, Antipholus and Dromio of Ephesus.
29) Maureen Godman argues that, in the "lockout scene," Antipholus of Ephesus stands for the playwright, who tries to prove that he can "bombast out a blank verse" as the best of his fellow writers.
In Shakespeare's most magical comedy, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Dan cross-dresses as Helena and in the farcical The Comedy of Errors he plays estranged twin, Antipholus of Syracuse.
Shakespeare now complicates the Plautine plot, and heightens the atmosphere of misunderstandings, by the ploy of creating not only double masters (the twins Antipholus of Ephesus and Antipholus of Syracuse), but also double servants (the twins Dromio of Syracuse and Dromio of Ephesus) (8) and two Ephesian sisters (Adriana and Luciana).