antiquark

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antiquark

[′an·tē¦kwärk]
(particle physics)
The hypothetical antiparticle of a quark, having electric charge, baryon number, and strangeness opposite in sign to that of the corresponding quark.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a paired quark and antiquark come into contact, they annihilate each other and the flux tube linking them disappears as well.
Furthermore, pairs of quarks and antiquarks randomly materialize out of the seeming emptiness of space forming a sea of short-lived particles that interact with the other quarks and gluons already present in baryons and mesons.
Each quark has an anti-matter equivalent known as antiquark.
The discovery of yet other combinations of quarks and antiquarks could illuminate the force that binds quarks and antiquarks together.
Electrically charged leptons are formed when the color charges of quarks and antiquarks with different flavors are annihilated, while neutrinos are formed when both the electric and color charges of quarks and antiquarks with the same flavor are annihilated.
For one thing, it could end what had been a puzzling absence of evidence for particles with groupings containing more than three quarks or antiquarks, which theorists for decades have been expecting to show up in accelerators.
The x-width of antiquarks is much smaller than that of quarks.
Quarks and their antiquarks are distributed in different phases by symmetrically with respect to the real-energy axis and separated by the plane of the real and electric imaginary energy axes.
This structure, called a chiral condensate, consists of quark-antiquark pairs, but only certain types of quarks pair up with certain types of antiquarks.
The work clearly shows that more momentum is transferred by quarks than be antiquarks.
This theory describes the force that binds different quarks and antiquarks together to create protons, neutrons, and other subatomic particles.
generally clusters of quarks and antiquarks whose total charge is negative), or the positively charged nucleus replaced by other positive particle (say clusters of quarks and antiquarks whose total charge is positive, etc.