psychopath

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Related to Antisocial Personality: borderline personality disorder, Antisocial behavior

psychopath

a person afflicted with a personality disorder characterized by a tendency to commit antisocial and sometimes violent acts and a failure to feel guilt for such acts
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, according to Mitchell and Mackenzie (2006), the number of items for the Antisocial Personality, Criminal History and Antisocial Associates subscales would need to be approximately doubled to yield an alpha of .
Antisocial personality traits have been consistently measured by specific domains of the Five Factor Model (FFM) (Joliffe, 2013; Caspi, Loeber, Lynam, Moffitt, Raine, & StouthamerLoeber, 2004; Jones, Lynam, & Miller, 2011).
One of the challenges in working with such clients is a coexisting diagnosis of Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD; American Psychiatric Association, 2013).
42) Moreover, psychological research has shown a connection between conduct disorder in childhood and adolescence and antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy in adulthood.
A psychiatric condition that is highly prevalent in individuals with substance use disorders and pathological gambling, and also linked to impulsive behaviors, is antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) (APA 2000).
Because of the wide impact on public safety or the economic well-being than other personality disorders, research has been done on antisocial personality disorder [15].
DEAR LEARNING: According to material from the National Institutes of Health: Sociopathology, also known as antisocial personality disorder, is a mental health condition in which a person has a long-term pattern of manipulating, exploiting or violating the rights of others.
8-fold increase in antisocial personality disorder, and a 4.
The meta-analysis by Zhong and colleagues [3] estimates the prevalence of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in Chinese individuals with heroin dependence.
The study also found that antisocial personality, social anxiety disorder, and PTSD were more frequent in the relatives of pathological gamblers independent of whether the relative also had pathological gambling.
Psychopathy is considered a personality disorder and was specifically included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) until it was conceptually merged in the DSM-III with antisocial personality disorder (APD).