Antisthenes

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Antisthenes

(ăntĭs`thənēz), b. 444? B.C., d. after 371 B.C., Greek philosopher, founder of the CynicsCynics
[Gr.,=doglike, probably from their manners and their meeting place, the Cynosarges, an academy for Athenian youths], ancient school of philosophy founded c.440 B.C. by Antisthenes, a disciple of Socrates.
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. Most of his paradoxical views stemmed from his early Sophist orientation, even though he became one of Socrates' most ardent followers. He believed that man's happiness lay in cultivating virtue for its own sake. To attain virtue, man must reduce his dependence on the external world to a minimum, disregard social convention, shun pleasure, and live in poverty. Antisthenes, like Xenophanes, repudiated polytheism, substituting one god, whom he described as unlike anything known to man. His view that each individual is unique had implications for ethics and for a theory of knowledge.
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Antisthenes

(444–371 B. C.) Greek philosopher and founder of Cynic school. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 121]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Antisthenes' Odysseus, Ajax's "wall" [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 7) of a shield reveals his cowardice, and Odysseus, protected only by t he "armor" of the beggar [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 10), sneaks within the Trojan walls, the sole defense of the snoring bulwark of the Achaeans.
51), Antisthenes analyzed Odysseus' most famous epithet polutropos as applying equally to the character and his speech: the polutropos man had a firm grasp of many tropoi (i.e., ways of appearing to an audience through speaking style).
(72) In the Rhetoric Aristotle associates the former technique (i.e., suiting one's character to audience type) with a sense of appropriateness (prepes, oikeios, 1408a, etc.), an idea whose rhetorical importance may echo Antisthenes' discussion of the oikeio s logos (C.
(44.) So Guthrie 304-05 conjectures; see also Kennedy 171, who cites Diogenes' evidence for it being a part of Antisthenes' Peri lexeos ou characteron.
Blass' 1871 edition groups the speech with those of Gorgias and Antisthenes. For translations of these speeches, see Gagarin and Woodruff.
Much of the scholarship on Antisthenes has focused on his philosophy of language and his connection to Socrates rather than on his literary criticism (e.g., Hoistad.
who notes that while Antisthenes' use of [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] connects it to both [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and the art of speaking, the two meanings are equally important to his discussion of [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
(66.) Detienne 52-55 traces Antisthenes' treatment of the epithet to analogies between heroic types and Pythagoras drawn by fifth-century Pythagoreans, and emphasizes the focus on rhetoric in this analogy in particular.