antitussive

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Related to Antitussives: Expectorants

antitussive

[¦an·tē¦təs·iv]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as benylin expectorants, that relieves coughing.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kardos, "Comprehensive evidence-based review on European antitussives," Bmj Open Respiratory Research, vol.
Methods: We investigated the antitussive effects of a KJ (30 ml/day; 762 mg genuine extracts with standardized contents of 0.2 mg/ml vasicine, 0.8 mg/ml chicoric acid, and 0.03 mg/ml eleutherosides B and E), bromhexine hydrochloride (24 mg/30 ml/day) and PL on cough and blood markers.
Observational results showed no difference in percentage of cough resolution between children treated with antitussive alone vs children receiving a combination of antibiotics and antitussives.
Included were all prescriptions for any of the different combinations of liquids (suspensions, syrups, elixirs, solutions, etc.) whose ingredients included corticosteroids, [beta.sub.2] agonists, xanthenes, antitussives, decongestants, expectorants, or antihistamines.
They covered antitussives, which are used to relieve coughs; expectorants, which promote the discharge of mucus from the respiratory tract; and combinations of drugs such as antihistamine and decongestant.
(11) Hydration and cough suppressants can "reduce laryngeal trauma associated with coughing unless the pulmonary condition and need to clear secretions militate against the use of antitussives." (12) The use of inhaled medication to treat pulmonary diseases is common but can also negatively impact the voice over the long term.
More than 400 spontaneous reports of serious adverse events associated with antitussives containing hydrocodone have been reported to the FDA's voluntary MedWatch program since 2005, including deaths due to overdose, although the agency cannot separate out those pertaining to unapproved versus approved products, Dr.
The ingredients under review are decongestants, first-generation antihistamines, antitussives, and expectorants, which are regulated by a monograph, under which they are classified as "generally recognized as safe and effective," based on advisory committee recommendations from the early 1970s.
Antihistamines, decongestants, and antitussives are common medications in cough and cold preparations; many OTC cough medications contain several active ingredients (Hartley, 2003) (see Table 3 for a list of common medications used for cough).
It would be wise for doctors to prescribe antitussives that do not contain codeine, promethazine hydrochloride or other substances that have high abuse potential, such as benzonate (Tessalon Perles) and dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM).
Providers can target symptoms with antipyretics, decongestants, antihistamines, and antitussives. In addition, practical nursing care such as steaming, increasing clear liquids, low residue diet, sufficient sleep, and good hand-washing can be the most effective treatment in overcoming an upper respiratory infection.
These medications usually consist of a combination of antipyretic analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen or ibuprofen), antitussives (e.g., dihydrocodeine phosphate or noscapine), expectorants (e.g., bromohexine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, or potassium guaiacolsulfonate), exogenous enzyme (e.g., lysozyme chloride), bronchodilator (e.g., dl-methylephedrine hydrochloride), antihistaminics (e.g., carbinoxamine maleate or mequitazine), vitamins (e.g., vitamin B1, B2, or vitamin C), and others (e.g., herbal medicines or caffeine).