Antoninus Pius


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Antoninus Pius

(Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus) (ăntōnī`nəs pī`əs), A.D. 86–A.D. 161, Roman emperor (138–161). After a term as consul (120) he went as proconsul to Asia, where he governed with distinction. He was adopted by the emperor Hadrian and, on succeeding him, administered the empire with marked ability and integrity. Italy was embellished with fine buildings, and the provinces were eased of much of their financial burden. During his reign the Wall of Antoninus was built in Britain. His wife was Faustina, aunt of his successor, Marcus AureliusMarcus Aurelius
(Marcus Aelius Aurelius Antoninus) , 121–180, Roman emperor, named originally Marcus Annius Verus. He was a nephew of Faustina, the wife of Antoninus Pius, who adopted him. Marcus married Antoninus' daughter, another Faustina.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Antoninus Pius

 

Born 86; died 161. Roman emperor from 138.

Antoninus Pius was the descendant of a senatorial family from the city of Nemausus (now Nîmes) in Transalpine Gaul. In 120 he was consul and later proconsul of the province of Asia. In 138 he was adopted by the emperor Hadrian. Becoming emperor after the death of Hadrian, he continued the latter’s foreign policy: he avoided wars and erected new defense structures along the borders of the state (for instance, the “Antonine Wall” in Britain). Antoninus Pius worked in close contact with the Senate, and his social policy was carried out in the interests of the wealthy classes. This caused dissatisfaction and uprisings among the masses in the provinces (in Egypt, Dacia, Achaea, Judaea, and Africa).

REFERENCE

Hüttl, W. Antoninus Pius. Prague, 1936.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Antoninus Pius

86--161 ad, emperor of Rome (138--161); adopted son and successor of Hadrian
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Also involved are the Acta of the two saints, also known as the Acts of Pastor and Timothy, a legendary text probably arising in the fifth or sixth century and placed in the third generation under Antoninus Pius (138-161); the Pastor of the title is possibly meant to be the author of the Shepherd of Hermas, dated to this period by reference in the Muratorian Canon.
During the Roman Empire's first 200 years, this tradition was common, with Tiberius, Caligula, Nero, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Lucius Verus all becoming Emperor through adoption.
The wall was erected around 142 by order of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, took 12 years to complete and stretches over 39 miles across the Central Belt of Scotland - and it's located about 50 yards from where I went to high school.
The most effective method was adoption: Nerva adopted Trajan, who adopted Hadrian, who adopted Antoninus Pius, who adopted Marcus Aurelius, who, unluckily, produced a son and heir, the terrible Commodus.
Augustus was also the last of the 'Five Good Emperors' - the others were Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian and Antoninus Pius. He was known as a deep thinker and his literary work Meditations, written in Greek, is still revered among stoic philosophy scholars.
Antoninus Pius had Marcus move to the imperial palace on the Palatine Hill and gradually began to involve him in the fearsome task of running an empire of about 3.5 million square miles with some 20 per cent of the population of the world.
The best known figure from the city was Opramoas who lived in the period of Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.C.).
The wall, which was completed in 142 AD, takes its name from Emperor Antoninus Pius.
IN 142 AD, Emperor Antoninus Pius built a wall to keep marauding Caledonian tribes out of the civilised Roman world.
She first appeared on coins in Roman times, with her first appearance on a bronze sestertius struck in Rome for Emperor Antoninus Pius, who ruled from AD138-161.
The bequests that Memmius allocated to save the gymnasium at Beroia may not have been intended by their donors to be spent on something else; but, in a case recorded by the jurist Valens under Hadrian or Antoninus Pius, the Senate ruled that money left to a community for a venatio and spectacula was not be used for that purpose, requiring it instead to be spent on public works (Dig.