Formicariidae

(redirected from Antpitta)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Formicariidae

[‚fȯr·mə·kə′rī·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The antbirds, a family of suboscine birds in the order Passeriformes.

Formicariidae

 

(antbirds), a family of birds of the order Passeriformes. Body length, 9.5–36 cm. The bill is laterally compressed and sometimes hooked at the tip. Terrestrial species are long-legged, and arboreal species short-legged. The males are garbed in contrasting colors, often with white, black, or red patches or transverse stripes; the females have monochromatic coloration. There are 222 species of antbirds, distributed from southern Mexico to central Argentina. They live hidden in forests or thickets. Antbirds build their nests in shrubs or, less frequently, on the ground. A clutch contains two or, rarely, three eggs, which are incubated for 14—17 days. Antbirds feed principally on insects, mainly ants.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A grapefruit-size bird that hops as if its legs were pogo sticks, the jocotoco antpitta was first described by a Western scientist, Bob Ridgely, in 1997.
The gnarled cloud forest near Podocarpus National Park may seem unlikely to science, but the long-legged featherball of a bird, a kind of antpitta, does quite well there.
Another antpitta, Myrmothera campanisona, is sometimes heard around the edges of gaps in continuous forest and may be more able to cope with habitat disturbance caused by fragmentation (but see Thiollay 1992).