Formicariidae

(redirected from Antpitta)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Formicariidae

[‚fȯr·mə·kə′rī·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The antbirds, a family of suboscine birds in the order Passeriformes.

Formicariidae

 

(antbirds), a family of birds of the order Passeriformes. Body length, 9.5–36 cm. The bill is laterally compressed and sometimes hooked at the tip. Terrestrial species are long-legged, and arboreal species short-legged. The males are garbed in contrasting colors, often with white, black, or red patches or transverse stripes; the females have monochromatic coloration. There are 222 species of antbirds, distributed from southern Mexico to central Argentina. They live hidden in forests or thickets. Antbirds build their nests in shrubs or, less frequently, on the ground. A clutch contains two or, rarely, three eggs, which are incubated for 14—17 days. Antbirds feed principally on insects, mainly ants.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A grapefruit-size bird that hops as if its legs were pogo sticks, the jocotoco antpitta was first described by a Western scientist, Bob Ridgely, in 1997.
If any bird could evade scientists for so long, it's an antpitta, says John W.
leucosticta, and the Spectacled Antpitta, Hylopezus perspicillatus) maintained well-established territories and were found predictably at specific points along the trails.
Birds that utilize forest into which chickens roam and that have ecologic behaviors that might put them at risk of coming into contact with poultry and poultry feces include ground birds (or those that spend a significant amount of time on the ground), such as Tynamidae (tinamous), Columbidae (pigeons and doves), Thamnophilidae (antbirds, antshrikes), Caprimulgidae (nightjars and nighthawks), Furnariidae (foliage gleaners and leaf tossers), Formicaridae (antpittas), Emberizidae (finches and grassquits), or Turdidae (thrushes), and birds that might either consume chickens or aggregate near foodstuff consumed by chickens, such as Cathartidae (vultures), some members of Accipitridae and Falconidae (hawks, eagles, falcons), Cracidae (guans), and Odontophoridae (quails).
This group includes the antpittas Grallaria varia and Hylopezus macularius, two of the largest terrestrial insectivores, as well as the leafscraper Sclerurus mexicanus.