Aoidos


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Aoidos

 

ancient Greek performer of epic songs. During the period when there were still no fixed texts the aoidos improvised to the accompaniment of a stringed instrument. In the Homeric epic poems the aoidos are described as singers in the service of communities or kings. There were also wandering aoidos, and their art played an essential role in the development of the Greek epic poem.

REFERENCES

Tronskii, I. M. Istoriia antichnoi literatury,3rd ed. Leningrad, 1957.
Radtsig, S. I. Istoriia drevnegrecheskoi literatury,2nd ed. [Moscow,] 1959.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Cognition and Type-Scenes: The Aoidos at Work." In F.
Michael Caesar well grasps some of these tensions in his essay "Voice, Vision and Orality." Focusing his analysis on the interaction of singer (aoidos) and listener in the Odyssey, Caesar stresses the visible and physical social context in which the oral performance is embedded, a context shaped by contingency and interaction with the audience.
(18) The Homeric phrase polyphemos aoidos, traditionally understood as referring to a singer who either "knows many songs" (i.e., pollai phemai) or "enjoys/bestows great fame" (i.e., polle pheme) also allows the definition "of resounding voice." Singers throughout the Odyssey are endowed with exceptionally penetrating voices: in 1.325-36, Phemius song in the hall is heard by Penelope in her upstairs chamber; in 17.260-63, Odysseus and Eumaeus hear Phemius tuning his lyre before they even reach the palace; in 22.376, Odysseus tells the polyphemos aoidos to wait outside the door and later enlists him (23.130-40) to strike up an indoor wedding song that passersby will bear outside.
aoidos, who were experts able to identify knights in full armour from
There is no robed and garlanded aoidos, no altar, nor even
He can retain and repeat tales, as an aoidos does, thus ensuring a poetic continuity.