Aomori

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Aomori

(äōmô`rē), city (1990 pop. 287,808), capital of Aomori prefecture, extreme N Honshu, Japan, on Aomori Bay. First opened to foreign trade in 1906, Aomori is now the chief transportation center of N Honshu, with important rail lines and ferry services. It is also the site of one of the world's longest tunnels, the Seikan Tunnel, which stretches 33.4 mi (53.7 km) and connects Honshu and Hokkaido. Fish and lumber are among its exports, many of which are shipped to Hokkaido. A modern city, it was rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1910 and again after severe air raids in 1945. Aomori prefecture (1990 pop. 1,482,935), 3,719 sq mi (9,632 sq km), has rich timber lands and famous apple orchards, in addition to producing rice, fish, beef, and dairy products. Aomori, Hachinohe, and Hirosaki are the major cities. The 2011 earthquake and tsunami led to severe damage in E coastal Aomori.

Aomori

 

a prefecture in Japan, in the northern part of the island of Honshu. Area, 9,600 sq km; population, 1.4 million (1965), about 55 percent of which is urban. Administrative center, Aomori.

The southern part of Aomori Prefecture is occupied by the northern spurs of the Ou and Dewa mountains (elevations to 1,625 m); in the north there are coastal depressions with scattered low-mountain ridges (mainly on Tsugaru and Shimokita islands). The prefecture is an agricultural region which is part of Tohoku, with isolated industrial centers. There is some mining of lead and zinc (Kamikita) and iron sands (the largest deposit in the country is in the area of Misawa). Manufacturing industry is poorly developed; saw-milling and timber processing are of the greatest significance. There are food, metallurgical, and petrochemical enterprises. (The center for metal industry is the fast-growing city of Hatinohe.) The cultivated area is 137,000 ha, including 80,000 ha under rice paddies (harvest, 388,000 tons) and 17,000 ha under gardens (mainly apples; Aomori contributes 66 percent of the country’s apple harvest). The livestock population (1965) is as follows: cattle, 34,000 (of which 25,600 were milk cows); horses, 14,000; and pigs, 86,000. There is fishing (catches of up to 250,000 tons). An underwater tunnel from Tsugaru to Hokkaido is under construction. Steam-driven trains run from Aomori to Hakodate (113 km). The Towada national park, with Japan’s most remarkable crater lake (Towada), is located in Aomori Prefecture.