aortic valve

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aortic valve

[ā′ȯrd·ik ′valv]
(anatomy)
A heart valve comprising three flaps which guards the passage from the left ventricle to the aorta and prevents the backward flow of blood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In one study, 503 and 497 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis at low risk for surgical complications were randomly selected to undergo aortic valve replacement with the Sapien 3 and traditional open-heart surgery, respectively.
Hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are the prime end users in the aortic valve industry, where hospitals constitute a larger end-user base for aortic valves and are expected to generate revenue of $8,106.4 million in the market by 2023.
In the Farmer II trial, the rates of death and disabling stroke were 2.9 percent with surgical aortic valve replacement performed via open heart surgery vs.
In current study, we hypothesized that NT-proBNP and uric acid are increased due to pressure overload in left ventricle hypertrophy due to aortic valve dysfunction.
28, 2013, my older brother, Perry Cimons, then 76 and a retired pharmacist from Yonkers, New York, underwent open-heart surgery to replace his deteriorating aortic valve. He spent eight days in the hospital and was back to normal after two months.
The heart was 10 x 12 x 7 cm; the ventricles were in diastolic position, left ventricle wall 21 mm, right ventricle 4 mm thick, myocardium on cross-section was brown, with a white hard elastic focal lesion of 10 mm in diameter in the middle of the anterior wall of the left ventricle; circumference of the tricuspid valve was 13 cm, mitral valve 10 cm, pulmonary valve 8 cm, aortic valve 7 cm; the valves were anatomically correct, leaflets were elastic, without thickening.
He had to wait for few months for the new larger valve to be launched in Bahrain before undergoing the procedure, known as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
Bicuspid Aortic Valve: An Unusual Cause of Aneurysm of Left Coronary Sinus of Valsalva.
All patients undergoing the procedure had severe aortic valve stenosis with the mean echo derived pressure gradient (PG) across the aortic valve of 70 +- 28 mmHg.
For years, the only way to replace a severely diseased aortic valve was with open-heart surgery, but the operation requires a long recovery period and may be too risky for some patients.
In view of these considerations and the fact that aortic valve calcification and atherosclerosis present common pathophysiological mechanisms, the appearance of CAVD can no longer be considered simply an age-related degenerative valvular process but rather an active highly complex process, of probable systemic etiology, which involves biochemical, immunological, and genetic factors in an interactive way [26].
Differential protein kinase C isoform abundance in ascending aortic aneurysms from patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valves. Circulation 2007; 116:1144-9.