apeman

(redirected from Ape man)
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apeman

any of various extinct apelike primates thought to have been the forerunners, or closely related to the forerunners, of modern man
References in periodicals archive ?
5 TARZAN, THE APE MAN (1981) BO DEREK told the story from the viewpoint of Jane.
Louise Currie (Billie Mason in The Ape Man) considered that
Then, after his swimming career ended, he became the sixth actor to portray Edgar Rice Burroughs' ape man Tarzan, a role he played in 12 movies, becoming by far the best known.
He said: "There was some disquiet in Wales in the 1930s about the influence of American culture with such films as Tarzan the Ape Man and Frankenstein.
The team thought naming the new species after the vine-swinging "ape man" might be a good way to "promote the conservation of this species and of course of the forest that it's living in," according to Philip-Sebastian Gehring, an evolutionary biologist at the Technical University of Braunschweig in Germany.
An hour or so later, when the raffle came to be drawn, the ape man pulled his furry head off - and it was Jeremy Beadle, absolutely wet with sweat, having been boiling hot in his disguise.
His other credits include "Indochine," "Beyond Rangoon," "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," "The Iron Triangle," "Fifty/Fifty," "Tarzan, the Ape Man" and "Ghosts Can't Do It" as well as a variety of Italian, French, German, and Canadian and British films.
The A&E Teacher's Guides consist of the following units: "Gorillas"; "Ape Man"; "Victoria and Albert"; and "Dizzy Gillespie." The History Channel Teacher's Guides consist of these units: "The World Trade Center"; "American Classics"; "Save Our History: Live from Jamestown"; and "Save Our History: USS Arizona." In addition, the booklet provides teaching ideas authored by classroom teachers.
In 1997, the complete skeleton of a 3.3-million-year-old ape man was discovered by paleoanthropologist Dr Ron Clark in the depths of a limestone cave at Sterkfontein, South Africa.
When actor Johnny Weissmuller hollered it in Tarzan the Ape Man (1932), it was, as Taliaferro describes, "a thing of primal virtuosity."
Again Clayton essayed speech with the ape man; but the replies, now vocal, were in a strange tongue, which resembled the chattering of monkeys mingled with the growling of some wild beast.