Apelles


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Related to Apelles: Zeuxis

Apelles

(əpĕl`ēz), fl. 330 B.C., Greek painter, the most celebrated in antiquity but now known only through descriptions of his works. He is thought to have studied under Ephorus of Ephesus and under Pamphilus of Amphipolis at Sicyon. He was court painter to Philip II of Macedon and to Alexander the Great. His portraits of Alexander included one in the Temple of Diana at Ephesus that showed Alexander wielding the thunderbolts of Zeus. Apelles excelled in painting horses, and according to Pliny the portrait of Antigonus Cyclops on horseback was his masterpiece. Most famous, perhaps, was the painting of Aphrodite rising from the sea. A painting made by Botticelli from Alberti's description of Apelles' Calumny is in the Uffizi. Apelles is said to have been the first to recognize the talents of ProtogenesProtogenes
, fl. c.300 B.C., one of the most celebrated Greek painters of Rhodes and Athens. Apelles is said to have been the first to recognize the talents of Protogenes, then 50 years old and known only as a painter of decorations for ships.
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. He also influenced MantegnaMantegna, Andrea
, 1431–1506, Italian painter of the Paduan school. He was adopted by Squarcione, whose apprentice he remained until 1456, when he procured his release.
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 and TitianTitian
, c.1490–1576, Venetian painter, whose name was Tiziano Vecellio, b. Pieve di Cadore in the Dolomites. Of the very first rank among the artists of the Renaissance, Titian was extraordinarily versatile, painting portraits, landscapes, and sacred and historical
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.

Apelles

4th century bc, Greek painter of mythological subjects, none of whose work survives, his fame resting on the testimony of Pliny and other writers
References in periodicals archive ?
Apelles made a cutting retort that the craftsman should only judge things he knew about and shouldn't go "beyond the sole", which is "ultra crepidam" in Latin.
You feel like you have a direct contact with the works: you actually enter into the Primavera.' That slowing down, and the newly intimate display, in turn encourages visitors to pause over other works in this room, seeking out compositional echoes--between the Birth of Venus and the Calumny of Apelles, say, which are now displayed next to each other.
In his reimagining and enlarging of the legend of two rivals competing for the love of a mistress in the tragi-comic musical Campaspe, for instance, he introduces and opposes two perspectives: the raw assertion of masculine desire and right of the conqueror Alexander to the aesthetic appreciation of the artist Apelles. In another tragi-comic treatment of myth, Endymion, the protagonist of the main plot is a devoted courtier-lover, who, under a spell, ages into an old man while he sleeps so that his "curled lockes bee turned to gray haires, and ...
MARIA: Pliny the Elder doesn't specify if Apelles said "supra" or "ultra." Anyway, it's the meaning that counts.
In the dedicatory letter to Edward Sulyard, Webbe acknowledges his intrusion in the field of literary criticism by using the exemplum of a legendary encounter between King Alexander and the painter, Apelles. Forced by Alexander to judge a drawing that the king had made to amuse himself, the painter concluded that the monarch had accomplished it merely as a king would, since painting was not among his natural talents.
Apelles Porto Alegre, irmao de Apolinario, em seguida, ofereceu-lhe, em nome das senhoras da cidade, a quem representava, uma escrivaninha de prata e um ramalhete de flores.
(8.) The publication is known as Tres epistolae de maculis solaribus ad Marcum Welserium, and was published under the pseudonym of Apelles post tabulam latens.
Finally, consider the 2013 sexual assault case of R v Muvunga, (35) where a senior defence counsel in Windsor brought an application to use Sandro Boticelli's painting "Calumny of Apelles" as a piece of demonstrative evidence in his closing address to the jury.
The Heritage of Apelles. New York: Cornell UP, 1976.
He aligned a string of (all male!) painters, sculptors, and architects from antiquity to the seventeenth century (and not beyond!) on either side of a central group comprising three seated ancients--the architect Ictinus, the painter Apelles, and the sculptor Phidias--flanked by an allegory of Gothic art on the left and an allegory of the Renaissance on the right, while on the proscenium the genie des arts (in the plural) get ready to hand out wreaths of laurels to deserving students.