Apemantus


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Apemantus

churlish, sarcastic advisor of Timon. [Br. Lit.: Timon of Athens]
References in periodicals archive ?
Interacting with EmmaClaire Brightlyn, as grumpy philosopher Apemantus, and Kirk Bage's unpleasant military captain Alcibades, this works brilliantly and the ironwork of the Kibble Palace rattles with passion.
Estill ventures an unexpected bit of psychological reading in her discussion of the good Archbishop's decontextualized stringing together of notably scurrilous insults hurled at one another by the title character and Apemantus in Shakespeare's Timon.
22) When Apemantus rejects what Timon's feast offers, it seems at first that he and not the feast is the problem.
5) Anger, madness, and misanthropy are, therefore, invariably linked to cognitive weakness; something which Apemantus had previously suggested when he visited Timon in the woods outside Athens: "This is in thee a nature but infected, / A poor unmanly melancholy" (Timon of Athens, 14.
Her touchingly staunch devotion is counterbalanced by the cynicism of Hilton McRae as the philosopher Apemantus.
Other characters catch the eye too, perhaps the brutally honest Apemantus, who foresees Timon's ruin and warns him of false friends, or Alcibiades who speaks Timon's final epitaph.
Because of the linguistic association between cynics and dogs, Apemantus is often called a dog in the play; in this production the flatterers at the banquet "barked" obediently in response to Apemantus's words, as if to suggest that this was a regular game they played in order to amuse Timon.
The guests' drunken profligacy was illustrated as the bread which Timon distributed among them became missiles flying between them, much to the sneering disgust of Bo Poraj's huge and shaggy Apemantus and the party broke up with the antics of an inebriated guest running around the stage, flashing his genitals.
Only those who are not part of this perfect circle--Alcibiades, who gives his deepest commitment to war, Apemantus the Cynic philosopher, who loves being right more than having goods, and the servants, who admire their master from a social distance--manifest friendship when Timon has need of them.
Her method tends to obscure differences, and has no room for the occasional startling phrase that seems to give us the author of a play in the act of writing rather than a convention: 'Then comes, dropping in after all, Apemantus, like himself.
Watching the debauchery is Apemantus, the only one who refuses to sponge off Timon's generosity, played in show-stealing style by Richard McCabe.
The first part of this is the message Apemantus dins into Timon's ears, and is not in the anonymous text, while the last is a summary of the end of the Middleton-Shakespeare play: civil war does not come into the Timon farce either.