aperture

(redirected from Aperature)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Aperature: Depth of field, Shutter speed

aperture

Physics
a. a usually circular and often variable opening in an optical instrument or device that controls the quantity of radiation entering or leaving it
b. the diameter of such an opening
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aperture

The diameter of the unobscured portion of the objective lens in a refracting telescope or of the primary mirror in a reflector. In a radio telescope it is the physical size of the antenna. As the aperture is increased, the telescope gathers more light, radio waves, etc., and thus will discern fainter objects: the radiation-gathering power depends on area, i.e. on the square of the aperture. A larger aperture also produces a smaller Airy disk and so has greater spatial resolution.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Aperture

An opening for the purpose of admitting light.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

aperture

[′ap·ə‚chər]
(electronics)
An opening through which electrons, light, radio waves, or other radiation can pass.
(graphic arts)
A rectangular cutout on an aperture card.
(optics)
The diameter of the objective of a telescope or other optical instrument, usually expressed in inches, but sometimes as the angle between lines from the principal focus to opposite ends of a diameter of the objective.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

aperture

(1) An orifice. It often refers to an opening in which light is allowed to pass in optical systems such as cameras and lasers. See f-stop and numerical aperture.

(2) (Aperture) A photo editing and management application for the Mac from Apple. Introduced in 2005 and used by professional photographers, Aperture provides sophisticated touch-up tools and works with the iPhoto library. See iLife.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
The slide film features a magnetic coating that makes it possible to print a range of data and shooting information on the slide mount, including frame title, shooting data such as aperature and shutter speed, and shooting date and time.
For example, there are useful summaries of field spectroradiometery and synthetic aperature radar (SAR).
"The eye, like a top-of-the-line modern camera, contains a self-adjusting aperature, an automatic focus system, and inner surfaces surrounded by a dark pigment to minimize the scattering of stray light.
A metal wire mesh with openings of one-eight inch (0.3 centimeters) was placed below the aperature so as to keep large insects out of the collector jar.
Various microscope objectives (x3.2, numerical aperature 0.07; x10, NA 0.22; x40, NA 0.75) were selected, depending on defect size.
1 Overall length: 45.5 inches Barrel length: 28.4 inches Weight: 48.5 pounds (without tripod) Feed system: 250-round fabric belt Sights: Front-- hooded blade Rear-- aperature adjustable by leaf from 200 to 2000 meters Rate of fire: 450 rpm Specifications: Pistoolmiltrailleur M.39 Caliber: 9mm Parabellum (Scherpe Patroon No.
F Abas, "A multistatic circular synthethic aperature radar for small object detection," IEEE Radar Conference, 262-266, Kansas City, MO, USA, May 2011.
Nevertheless, we reported earlier that very thin optical sections can be obtained in DIC, polarization, and phase contrast microscopy in the absence of confocal imaging by using well-corrected optics of high numerical aperature (NA) and video and digital contrast enhancement (3).