Apgar score

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Apgar score

[′ap·gär ‚skȯr]
(medicine)
An index used to evaluate a newborn infant's physical condition based on a rating of 0-2 for each of five criteria: heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, response to stimulation, and skin color.
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In the present study, APGAR scores were good for all newborn infants, and none required tracheal intubation and ventilation, or admission to special care baby unit in the immediate post delivery period.
The study found no differences in any of the measured primary outcomes: length of first stage of labor, cesarean section, maternal satisfaction with childbirth, or Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes.
We explored the association between neonatal mortality (dependent variable) and the following explanatory variables: maternal schooling (up to seven years; eight years and over); maternal age (up to 19 years; 20 to 34 years; 35 years and over); presence of a partner (yes, no); maternal history of neonatal death (no, yes); number of living children (none; one to three; four or more); type of pregnancy (simple, multiple); number of antenatal appointments (zero to three; four to six; seven or more,); type of delivery (vaginal or caesarian); gestational age at birth in weeks (< 28; 28 to 36; 37 and over); birth weight in grams (< 1,500; 1,500 to 2,499; 2,500 and over); and Apgar score in the first minute of life (zero to three; four to six; seven or over).
Paired t-test was applied to see the difference of APGAR score at 1 minute and 5 minutes.
Each factor was then weighted according to the participant's perceived importance on a four-point scale (very important = 4, important = 3, unimportant = 2, very unimportant = 1), as outlined in the following algorithm: Advantage/challenge score x Importance score = Community Apgar Score.
Moreover, birth weight < 2 500 g (p = 0.038) and low Apgar score (< 7) (p =0.010) at one minute were independently associated with mortality [Table 3].
In group A there were 178 (92.7%) neonates with APGAR score of greater than 5 at 1 minute in contrast to 173 (90.1%) in group B with (p = 0.363).
The infant factors that were associated with poor outcome (severe HIE or death) were low Apgar scores at 5 and 10 minutes, need for adrenaline, delay in time to spontaneous respiration, low pH, high base deficit and low bicarbonate.
In the context of side effects, Apgar scores at 5 min were similar in both the groups of our study, that is, the number of babies with Apgar score of <8 at 5 min was three in group 1 and six in group 2.
The OR for the occurrence of disease was 1.92 times higher in children with Apgar scores <5 than in those with scores of 10 (P<0.001).