Apicius, Marcus Gabius

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Apicius, Marcus Gabius

(əpĭsh`əs), 1st cent., Roman gourmet. He squandered most of his large fortune on feasts and then, anticipating a need to economize, committed suicide. The cookbook called Apicius probably dates from a century later.
References in classic literature ?
Rare birds, retaining their most brilliant plumage, enormous fish, spread upon massive silver dishes, together with every wine produced in the Archipelago, Asia Minor, or the Cape, sparkling in bottles, whose grotesque shape seemed to give an additional flavor to the draught, -- all these, like one of the displays with which Apicius of old gratified his guests, passed in review before the eyes of the astonished Parisians, who understood that it was possible to expend a thousand louis upon a dinner for ten persons, but only on the condition of eating pearls, like Cleopatra, or drinking refined gold, like Lorenzo de' Medici.
He has worked as chef de cuisine under Michelin-starred chefs such as Jean Pierre Vigato of Apicius and Jean Francois Piege at the Hotel de Crillon.
The Philippine delegation meanwhile comprised of Filipino counterparts exploring business opportunities in areas of food/dairy, poultry, pharmaceuticals and software development namely ALC Holdings, Apicius, Inc.
Apicius, a collection of Roman recipes dating back to the third century AD, contain one of the earliest written accounts of preparing asparagus for the table.
A recipe from the surviving ancient Roman cookbook, Apicius, details an item called Isicia Omentata which comprises minced meat, pepper, wine, pine nuts, and a rich fish-based sauce called garum, all formed into a pattie.
The recipe in the Roman cookbook Apicius says it is made of minced meat, pepper, wine, pine nuts and a fish-based sauce.
The dish, called Isicia Omentata, is taken from an ancient Roman cookbook, Apicius, written by an unknown author in the late fourth or fifth centuries AD.
In the 4th or 5th century, Apicius, a book of recipes named for the 1st-century gourmet Marcus Gavius Apicius and compiled by an unknown author, contained instructions for preparing just such a dish.
In the third century, Roman culinarian Apicius of fered parsnip recipes and called the parsnip by its Latin name, pastinaca, in his cookbook De re Coquinaria.
Esta voz latina remite a De re coquinaria (siglos IV o V), unico recetario romano preservado, en el que Apicius, su autor, plasmo sus costumbres alimentarias (Martinez Llopis, 1981: 59).
The truth is that the origin of "French toast" can be traced back to Ancient Roman times with a recipe given in the Apicius, a very old cookery book featuring a collection of Latin recipes.