Apollinarianism


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Related to Apollinarianism: Docetism, Ebionism, Gnosticism, Pelagianism, Monothelitism

Apollinarianism

(əpŏlĭnâr`ēənĭzəm), heretical doctrine taught by Apollinaris or Apollinarius (c.315–c.390), bishop of Laodicea, near Antioch. A celebrated scholar and teacher, author of scriptural commentary, philosophy, and controversial treatises, he propounded the theory that Jesus possessed the LogosLogos
[Gr.,=word], in Greek and Hebrew metaphysics, the unifying principle of the world. The central idea of the Logos is that it links God and man, hence any system in which the Logos plays a part is monistic. The Greek Heraclitus held (c.500 B.C.
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 in place of a human mind, and hence, while perfectly divine, he was not fully human. Apollinarianism was popular in spite of its repeated condemnation, particularly by the First Council of Constantinople. It anticipated MonophysitismMonophysitism
[Gr.,=belief in a single nature], a heresy of the 5th and 6th cent., which grew out of a reaction against Nestorianism. It was anticipated by Apollinarianism and was continuous with the principles of Eutyches, whose doctrine had been rejected in 451 at Chalcedon
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References in periodicals archive ?
After its condemnations by the Councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon, Apollinarianism retreated into the welcoming bosom of the Monophysite Churches.
Raven, Apollinarianism: an Essay on the Christology of the Early Church (Cambridge 1923).
The formula of Chalcedon affirms the following: that there is only one Son, therefore denying subordinationism, Arianism, and Nestorianism; that the Logos is impassible and immutable; that there are two distinct natures in Christ; that Jesus Christ was fully human, possessing a real human body with mind and soul, thus ruling out Apollinarianism; and that the Son is co-eternal with God the Father, while also born of a human being, Mary, the Mother of God, or theotokos.
Swinburne is insistent that this does not commit him to Apollinarianism, and in one sense he is right.
While they clearly emphasized the full humanity of Christ (against Apollinarianism), their two-nature Christology is designed to avoid speaking carelessly about the fullness of God's presence and, thereby, implicating God in things properly human.
I place this event in the fall of 376, and believe that one cannot speak of Apollinarianism as a distinct sect, with its own hierarchy and propaganda, until this time.