Apollo program

(redirected from Apollo Astronauts)
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Apollo program

[ə′päl·ō ¦prō·grəm]
(aerospace engineering)
The scientific and technical program of the United States that involved placing men on the moon and returning them safely to earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Race car drivers and firefighters today use liquid-cooled garments based on on the devices created for Apollo astronauts to wear under their spacesuits.
The Apollo astronauts returned with huge amounts of lunar dust in their modules.
Apollo astronauts gathered for evening events, and daily air shows kept the crowds entertained.
The actual lunar samples returned a few years later by Apollo astronauts did not match tektites in composition.
A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts
They found that 43 per cent of the Apollo astronauts died from a cardiovascular problem compared with 11 per cent of the low Earth orbit astronauts.
The Apollo astronauts were, and still remain, almost immortal figures, but she wasn't particularly star-struck, just another day on the job.
In addition, by focusing on Roosa's other roles with NASA--not just his astronaut duties on Apollo 14--Moseley paints a vividly clear picture of the inner workings of that organization during the Apollo program, another rarity for biographies of Apollo astronauts.
Magnetized lunar rocks hauled back by Apollo astronauts show that, at some point, the ancient moon had a hefty magnetic field.
This is equally true for a wide range of moon films, including the theatricality of Melies, the incredulity of camp, the illegibility of footage shot by Apollo astronauts and the revisionary history of Transformers 3.
Like the "Earthrise" images taken from the Moon's surface by the Apollo astronauts, this new photo from an orbiting Nasa satellite serves as a timely reminder of how beautiful and precious our world is.
"When the Apollo astronauts went to the moon, it wasn't to launch tourism on the moon and open hotels and make money," pilot Bertrand Piccard told Wired.