Apollo Computer


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Apollo Computer

(company)
A company making workstations often used for CAD.

From 1980 to 1987, Apollo were the largest manufacturer of network workstations. Apollo workstations ran Aegis, a proprietary operating system with a Posix-compliant Unix alternative frontend. Apollo's networking was particularly elegant, among the first to allow demand paging over the network, and allowing a degree of network transparency and low sysadmin-to-machine ratio that is still unmatched.

Apollo's largest customers were Mentor Graphics (electronic design), GM, Ford, Chrysler, and Boeing (mechanical design). Apollo was acquired by Hewlett-Packard in 1989, and gradually closed down over the period 1990-1997.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among its backers are FMR, the holding company for the Fidelity mutual funds; Boston Capital Ventures and Apollo Computer entrepreneur John William Poduska.
Husak, who is also CEO of Plexxi, worked at Apollo Computer and 3Com after 3Com bought his company Synernetics, a maker of ATM switches, in 1993.
His software development background includes senior positions at Hewlett-Packard, Apollo Computer, Wang Laboratories and Honeywell Information Systems.
Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) laid off people by the tens of thousands; Wang Computers, Data General, and Apollo Computer sank beneath the waves.
On a call yesterday Bishop, who also built and managed world sales organizations at DEC and Apollo Computer, said he was 100% behind the plan he inherits from Belluzzo, although some details of its execution may change.
In early 1989 we broadened our programming capability by adding an Apollo computer with Deltacam DUCT software, an advanced computer-imaging system that speeds the modeling of complex surface shapes.
([dagger])Apollo is a trademark of Apollo Computer Inc.
Apollo Computer, Inc., based in Chelmsford, Mass., has announced the installation of the 500th Apollo workstation at the University of Michigan, site of one of the largest university computing networks in the world.
While large host computers are still part of the scenario for many large companies, users are taking increasing advantage of the local computing power available through less expensive engineering workstations, such as those available from Sun Microsystems and Apollo Computer.
Guest Systems Council participants were: Apollo Computer, Inc., Atherton Technology, Bolt Beranek and Newman, Inc., Cadre Technologies, Inc., Context Corporation, Data Base Engines, Inc., Digital Equipment Corporation, Flavors Technology, Inc., Gould, Inc., Index Technologies Corporation, Interactive Software Corporation, Interleaf, Inc., Intermetrics, Inc., Metier Management Systems, Inc., Personal Library Software, Quantitative Technology Corporation, Sun Microsystems, Inc., Symbolics, Inc., Texas Instruments, Inc., and Unitech Software, Inc.
The first foray came in 1995 when HP took a group of engineers from its Apollo Computer acquisition and set them the task of building web applications for HP-UX.
A workstation is "a product that offers the combination of hardware horsepower in a 32-bit environment, tightly-coupled graphics capabilities and also networking capabilities," says Pierre Bouchard, of Apollo Computer, Inc.