Apollo program

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Apollo program

[ə′päl·ō ¦prō·grəm]
(aerospace engineering)
The scientific and technical program of the United States that involved placing men on the moon and returning them safely to earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
"In December, 1972, I stood on the bank of the Banana River, this time about six miles from launch pad 39a as Apollo 17 climbed into the midnight sky, lighting up the Florida peninsular for hundreds of miles around, on the last ever Apollo mission to the moon, the last of the three J-Series science missions beginning with Apollo 15 the previous year.
To achieve these results, the scientists analysed the chemical composition of a diverse range of samples collected during the Apollo missions. The study 'Early Moon formation inferred from hafnium-tungsten systematics' was published in Nature Geoscience.
I was reminded of interviewing a fiery feminist back in the 1970s who denounced the Apollo missions for their alleged male imagery of thrusting rockets: "It's all so bloody phallic," she complained.
Was the launch planned to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Apollo mission?
The science based on the Apollo mission continues, even after half a century.
The technologies born of the Apollo missions shaped life in more ways than we often recognise
He was later tasked, for the Apollo missions, with solving the problem of how to communicate with the spacecraft over the vast distance to the Moon.
With Kennedy's words still ringing in ears, the Apollo mission swung into full throttle.
She was the first woman in an operational support role in the control centre and the only one in all Apollo missions.
In "The Apollo Missions for Kids", author Jerome Pohlen tells the story of this an American era in space exploration from the perspective of those who lived it the astronauts and their families, the controllers and engineers, and the technicians and politicians who made the impossible possible.
The analysis was published in Nature Geoscience and examined the shallow moonquakes recorded by the Apollo missions, establishing links between them and very young surface features.