Dionysian

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Dionysian

(in the philosophy of Nietzsche) of or relating to the set of creative qualities that encompasses spontaneity, irrationality, the rejection of discipline, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in his epic verse drama and later symbolist plays, there seems to be an obvious tension between what one might call Apollonian and Dionysian elements that deserves exploration even if a certain critical tact may be needed.
Notably, Aschenbach's Apollonian upbringing did not offer the youthful blitheness that he admires in Tadzio, he had "never known youth's idleness, its carefree negligent ways," nor had he enjoyed the conventional male-male camaraderie that he observes between Tadzio and Jasiu.
The Apollonian aspect of existence bestows upon the chaotic, Dionysian womb of things what Nietzsche refers to as "the principium individuationis" (Nietzsche, 1956, 22).
He also claims that Nietzsche abandons the metaphysical duality he inherits from Schopenhauer as early as Human, All Too Human, and arguably this abandonment leads to the disappearance of the Apollonian in Nietzsche's later works (39).
But in order to elaborate both the Apollonian and Dionysian dimensions of this teaching, we shall first require an account of how the dialogue is itself rhetorically structured like a Silenus.
208) breaks out in the Apollonian Greece, causing the irruption of the party, of the will and of the creator energy, wellspring that the Christian world attempted to suppress.
The solution to this problem that Daniels develops, rightly, is that the Apollonian and the Dionysian are understood more broadly than in Schopenhauer as all at once forces, forms of art, states of consciousness, and overall moods.
A famous example is the Apollonian ball packing, see for instance [Boy73, BdPP94, [GLM.
almost in spite of its Apollonian phrasing, places him in kinship with
In this work, a novel circular shaped Apollonian fractal UWB antenna is constructed based on Descartes Circle Theorem (DCT) [21].
The Nietzschean antithesis of Apollonian idyll and Dionysian brutality in Hans Castorp's dream visions in the "Snow" chapter of The Magic Mountain recurs in the later novel when Zeitblom explains the two-sided, evil and pious "entrance of the dark and uncanny into the service of the gods" in Classical Greece (10).
1) Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy (1872) is useful in this enterprise, because it analyzes the same struggle between Apollonian and Dionysian forces that characterizes the stories of both Marsyas and Empedocles.