Dionysian

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Dionysian

(in the philosophy of Nietzsche) of or relating to the set of creative qualities that encompasses spontaneity, irrationality, the rejection of discipline, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The "hellish laughter" evokes Dionysus, and the "children's chorus" simultaneously acts as an Apollonian veil over Dionysian ecstasy and recalls the chorus of Greek tragedy, which has been lost in art; a fact that Nietzsche laments in The Birth of Tragedy.
But in his epic verse drama and later symbolist plays, there seems to be an obvious tension between what one might call Apollonian and Dionysian elements that deserves exploration even if a certain critical tact may be needed.
Notably, Aschenbach's Apollonian upbringing did not offer the youthful blitheness that he admires in Tadzio, he had "never known youth's idleness, its carefree negligent ways," nor had he enjoyed the conventional male-male camaraderie that he observes between Tadzio and Jasiu.
The Apollonian aspect of existence bestows upon the chaotic, Dionysian womb of things what Nietzsche refers to as "the principium individuationis" (Nietzsche, 1956, 22).
He also claims that Nietzsche abandons the metaphysical duality he inherits from Schopenhauer as early as Human, All Too Human, and arguably this abandonment leads to the disappearance of the Apollonian in Nietzsche's later works (39).
In particular, I will demonstrate show how the speech of Alcibiades subverts Diotima's more optimistic (Apollonian) account of the erotic ascent to philosophy, and in doing so, I will argue that these are not radically opposite accounts, but rather two moments in the temporal scheme of seduction that aims, ultimately, at raising the potential philosopher into philosophy.
208) breaks out in the Apollonian Greece, causing the irruption of the party, of the will and of the creator energy, wellspring that the Christian world attempted to suppress.
The solution to this problem that Daniels develops, rightly, is that the Apollonian and the Dionysian are understood more broadly than in Schopenhauer as all at once forces, forms of art, states of consciousness, and overall moods.
The Apollonian can be seen as an attempt to impose a static form and identity onto matter, whereas feminine matter--a creative, dynamic energy--always resists such attempts.
Nietzsche pits intuition, metaphor, and the Dionysian against rationality, conceptual reification, and the Apollonian. His aphoristic style of writing enables perspective by incongruity.
Apollonian ball packings form a renowed class of infinite ball packings, see for instance [GLM+05, GLM+06].
At the time, Nietzsche was a professor of classical philology (the study of language in written historical sources); in The Birth of Tragedy, he contemplated the Apollonian and Dionysian elements of classical Athenian tragedy, viewing ancient plays as an art form that rose above the fundamental hopelessness, meaninglessness, and nihilism that surrounds life.