Dionysian

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Dionysian

(in the philosophy of Nietzsche) of or relating to the set of creative qualities that encompasses spontaneity, irrationality, the rejection of discipline, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recognizing that each of the characters has both Apollonian and Dionysian associations, Riede suggests that while "the Nietzschean terms help to define the world of Empedocles on Etna" it is impossible to discern a clear dialogue between Apollonian and Dionysian forces in the poem (p.
In this push and pull between a liberating and a restraining aesthetic, between a rejection of artificial conventions and an acceptance of guiding aesthetic principles, Wolfe presents himself as an artist aspiring toward a dialectic accommodation between the Apollonian and Dionysian artistic visions.
Wagner identifies both Apollonian and Dionysian elements in Amfortas's Christian knighthood.
The book's most far-reaching essay is Diana Myers's 'Hellenism and Barbarism in Mandel'shtam': if the tension between Apollonian and Dionysian principles led to Mandel'shtam's best work, Symbolism's over-reliance on Nietzschean aesthetic 'barbarism', which may be summarized by Theophile Gautier's words 'plutot la barbarie que l'ennui', the most prophetic outcry of the nineteenth century' (George Steiner, In Bluebeard's Castle.
For instance, Cowan's discussion of 'Lawrence's Dualism' (Chapter 2) focuses exclusively on the dialectic of Apollonian and Dionysian energy in The Ladybird.
After the business meeting, Janice McCullagh moderated the final session of papers: "The Harmony of the Apollonian and Dionysian Aesthetics in Thomas Wolfe and the Visual Responses of Douglas W.
Cy was both Apollonian and Dionysian, a Virginia gentleman who painted, when he painted, his fists holding balls of pigment.
James Pilkington, bishop of Durham early in Elizabeth's reign, emerges as a moderate Calvinist with a theology compounded of what Hardman calls Apollonian and Dionysian elements; his social concerns were evidently deeply felt and his views of the religious and political establishment he served were sometimes sharply critical.
Nietzsche argues that Greek tragedy arose out of the fusion of what he termed Apollonian and Dionysian elements--the former representing measure, restraint, harmony, and the latter unbridled passion--and that Socratic rationalism and optimism spelled the death of Greek tragedy.
His body of work makes two things obvious: the first is the musicality of his choreography, and the second is the manner in which his ballets fall into some loose categories that could be defined, equally loosely, as Apollonian and Dionysian. And, of course, like all obvious things, these two are far less obvious on second sight than on first.
How might it be, for instance, if later-twentieth-century feminist theory were bypassed, and this body of work--with all its dangerous, unstable vitality and its contradictory Apollonian and Dionysian faces--rerouted directly through such theory's eminence grise, Friedrich Nietzsche?
Oppositions of inside and outside, war and peace, life and death, Apollonian and Dionysian are questioned, but not all resolved, in these immaculately fabricated worlds.