Apollonius


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Apollonius

(ăp'əlō`nēəs), in the books of the Maccabees. 1 Governor of Coele-Syria and Phoenicia for Seleucus IV. He oppressed the Jews and was killed by Judas Maccabaeus. 2 Governor of Coele-Syria under Alexander Balas.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Philostratus notes that Apollonius of Tyana stopped over at a Parthian fire sanctuary of Hellenic style.
Then we build the novel model by employing the property of the circle of Apollonius. The Inter-Small cell handover model based on the Apollonius circle is shown in Fig.
This force was stronger in men and arms than that commanded by Apollonius, and it struck fear into the army of Judas, who worried that their small band couldn't survive, much less defeat, such a force.
Apollonius tells us that Heracles had just captured the Erymanthian boar when he heard that Jason was recruiting heroes (1.122-1131).
Fernandez who is associated with the Hollywood studio Apollonius Films is scouting for talent and will also be visiting Chennai next weekend.
191) The grammarian Apollonius Dyscolus identifies these words as coming from the first book of Sappho's collected poetry.
With this innovative diachronic approach, Professor Heerink opens a new dimension of ancient metapoetics and offers many insights into the works of Apollonius of Rhodes, Theocritus, Virgil, Ovid, Valerius Flaccus, and Statius.
Philostratus' Life of Apollonius of Tyana, the novelistic biography of a first-century Pythagorean philosopher and ascetic, is increasingly recognised as a literary work of considerable subtlety, and one which plays complex games with fact and fiction.
While studying lunar topography derived from the laser altimeter on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (http://is.gd/ LOLA_map), I happened to spot a peculiar feature on the floor of Apollonius (at right).
250 CE), defined marriage as "the joining of a husband and wife and a sharing of their whole fife, a union of divine and human law." Other evidence, from romances like Leucippe and Clitophon, The Ephesian Tale, and The History of Apollonius, Prince of Tyre, to the widespread erotic representations in Roman homes (notably the ubiquitous ceramic lamps that frequently depicted symplegmata, or sexual positions of every sort) argues for the flourishing of something like companionate marriage.