Apollonius Rhodius


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Apollonius Rhodius

(ăp'əlō`nēəs rō`dēəs), fl. 3d cent. B.C., epic poet of Alexandria and Rhodes. He became librarian at Alexandria. His extant work, the Argonautica, is a Homeric imitation in four books on the story of the Argonaut heroes.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Hellenistic Chronology: Theocritus, Callimachus, and Apollonius Rhodius." In Papanghelis and Rengakos 2008, 73-92.
Homeric Hapax Legomena in the Argonautica of Apollonius Rhodius. Stuttgart: F.
Apollonius Rhodius, The Argonautica, The Loeb Classical Library, London, William Heinemann, 1930.
The case with Apollonius Rhodius's Argonautika was rather similar, for here too the Greek text had only just come into circulation.
Now that Apollonius Rhodius has become not only the subject of a substantial scholarly industry, but also an author widely prescribed in Classical Civilization courses, it is good to see the choice of translations of the poem expanded by Peter Green's (B)(*)The Argonautika.(11) Green uses a kind of free verse, typically lines of five/six beats.
The Argonautica of Apollonius Rhodius deals with a band of heroes one generation before the great warriors at Troy, and the narrative does not really concern itself directly with the later generation.
The story of Jason and the Argonauts has captured the imaginations of translators, adapters, movie producers, and pedants, but until now Greekless readers who wanted a faithful English version of the Argonautica of Apollonius Rhodius had to rely on R.
We are told, for example, that it is principally a realization of the scientific cosmogonies outlined programmatically by Apollonius Rhodius in the song of Orpheus (Arg.
A curious variation (also missed) occurs in Apollonius Rhodius' Argonautica iii.
Romance finds its origins perhaps in late Hellenistic times, having developed from erotic and exotic approaches to literature in Euripides, Menander, and Apollonius Rhodius, but it did not reach full bloom until the age of the Second Sophistic in the second century A.D., when rhetoricians encouraged their students to create improbable human situations rife with problems on which they might conduct debate.
Ancient accounts differ as to where the Amazons lived; Herodotus places them in Scythia, north of the Black Sea; Apollonius Rhodius ' Argonautica has them inhabiting a portion of the south shore.
Apollonius Rhodius: Allusion and Exemplarity." PCPS 42: 60-88.