apoprotein

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Related to Apoproteins: lipoprotein lipase

apoprotein

[¦ap·ə¦prō‚tēn]
(biochemistry)
The protein portion of a conjugated protein exclusive of the prosthetic group.
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This combination of traits is highly suggestive that the transcript produces an apoprotein able to bind to a retinal-based chromophore to form a photopigment capable of absorbing light.
That minor protein, isolated by Shore and Shore (5) and referred to as the arginine-rich apoprotein, was apoE [for a personal glimpse of these early days, see (6)].
58) In addition, they showed type II cell hypertrophy and surfactant accumulation (both surfactant apoproteins and lipids), all features seen in various forms of human interstitial lung disease.
Blood lipids, lipoproteins, apoproteins, and uric acid in men fed diets containing fructose or high-amylose cornstarch.
Copper transfer between Neurospora copper metallothionein and type 3 copper apoproteins.
Some topics explored are apolipoproteins in primary antiphospholipid syndrome, the association of apolipoprotein E and delirium, apolipoproteins and lipids in an overweight man with familial hypertriglyceridemia, the structure of apoproteins of hen egg yolk low-density lipoproteins, and apoE for application in gene therapy.
The apoproteins can be classified into two main groups: hydrophobic and amphipathic (having hydrophobic and hydrophilic aspects).
Cholesterol, lipoproteins , apoproteins and heart disease present status and future prospectus.
Second, although it is now recognized that the hydrophobic apoproteins SP-B and SP-C are required to create the lung lining film and for it to vary surface tension, (2) in most neonatal patients there is enough "extra" endogenous apoproteins SP-B/C to incorporate any exogenous phospholipids instilled into the lungs to significantly improve the function of the lining film.
The free fatty acids (FFA) can travel joined with albumin, however, phospholipids, cholesterol, and triglycerydes, are combined with apoproteins to produce soluble macromolecules denominated lipoproteins (1).