Apostolic Constitutions


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Constitutions, Apostolic,

late-4th-century compilation, in eight books, of administrative canons for the clergy and the laity and of guides for worship. They were supposed to be works of the apostles, but actually included the greater part of the Didascalia Apostolorum, a lost Greek treatise of 3d-century origin, most of the DidacheDidache
[Gr.,=teaching], early Christian work written in Greek, called also The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles. Dates for its composition suggested by scholars have ranged from A.D. 50 to A.D. 150.
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, and fragments from Hippolytus and Papias. The work concludes with a collection of 85 moral and liturgical canons known as the "Apostolic Canons," a portion of which became part of canon law of the Western Church. The work is thought to be of Syrian origin. The whole is a valuable primary source on early church history and practice.

Apostolic Constitutions:

see Constitutions, ApostolicConstitutions, Apostolic,
late-4th-century compilation, in eight books, of administrative canons for the clergy and the laity and of guides for worship. They were supposed to be works of the apostles, but actually included the greater part of the Didascalia Apostolorum,
..... Click the link for more information.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Greek Didascalia apostolorum, written in Syria in the third century, translated into Latin and Syriac in the fourth century, and reworked in Greek by the redactor of the Apostolic Constitutions around 380 near Antioch, represents a prime witness to this tradition.
In this regard three authors merit attention: the pseudoapostolic redactor of the Apostolic Constitutions, Gregory of Elvira, and Nilus of Ancyra.
Not only are the New Sacraments invalid; but the dogmatic Apostolic Constitution "Cum Ex Apostolatus Officio" issued by Pope Paul IV on 15 February 1559, has been completely ignored.
In addition to the New Testament books, the Apostolic Constitutions, the two letters of Clement, and Hermas are also canonical.
As early as the fourth-century Apostolic Constitutions, (116) there are clear differences between the ordinations of presbyter and deacon, on the one hand, and those of subdeacon and reader, on the other hand.
Apostolic constitutions are considered the highest form of legislative documents.
However, in another early church document, the Apostolic Constitutions, the duties of a woman deacon were equated to that of a male subdeacon, although they officially ranked as deacons.
Several church orders, including the Epitome of Book VIII of the Apostolic Constitutions, the Canons of Hippolytus, and the Testamentum Domini as well as some Greek fragments clearly attest to the original.
Papal (from apostolic constitutions to allocutions), conciliar (from constitutions to statutes), synodal (from decrees to propositions), and Roman dicasterial (from general decrees to replies) documents afford rich insights not only in the structural and procedural complexities of consecrated life, but also in the development and style of the legal tradition in the Church.
His explanation of why Christians would have become disaffected from two-ways doctrine starting in the third century (103-105) depends on an unconvincing interpretation of the doctrine in the Apostolic Constitutions and neglects documentary evidence of the two ways from the fourth through the eleventh centuries.
That would provide the clue for correct interpretation of the Scriptures and, say, apostolic constitutions.