Apothegms


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Related to Apothegms: aphorism, aspersion

Apothegms

 

old collections of secular narrative literature, containing witty utterances or edifying stories about incidents from the lives of famous people. Apothegms were concerned with the behavioral standards of people in their personal and social lives. The authors of similar collections were, in particular, F. Petrarch and G. Boccaccio. At the end of the 16th century apothegms had penetrated into Polish manuscript literature and in the second half of the 17th century into Russian manuscript literature. The first printed edition of apothegms in Russia was published in 1711. At the end of the 18th century individual stories drawn from apothegms were included in N. G. Kurganov’s Letter-writer.

References in periodicals archive ?
That should give you the flavor of this very enjoyable book; but I can't resist adding a couple of the apothegms that stood out to me.
How different is the tenor of Patmore's apothegms from his "Aurea Dicta"; for example, "if you wish to influence the world for good, leave it, forget it and think of nothing but your own interest," (7) or "the power of the soul for good is in proportion to the strength of its passion.
In his Moral Epistle 84, Seneca employs a metaphor that we find reflected in numerous early modern collections of apothegms, prayers, meditations, poems, epigrams, and elegies, and which is embodied, through its etymology, in the anthology: (1)
96) Bruni's exit from the realm of scholarly biography leads him to disregard most of the staple features of the Laertian biographical paradigm: he does not provide apothegms or homonyms, nor does he even bother to list the works one by one.
One of the few apothegms of any validity from that exploded prophet, Marx, is that historical events repeat themselves first as a tragedy and secondly as a farce.
Her street corner apothegms were widely savored in the psychedelic community.
Less, in this clever and often memorable torrent, would have been more; now the reader - no longer an imaginary undergraduate but a desperate veteran of marital wars - is the patient, at first fascinated but eventually exhausted, of a brilliant, cheery, and untiring therapist, determined to call on whatever means, including humorous anecdote, apothegms, personal experiences (more and more the case in Mazzarella's books), to set him right, or at least to make him feel guilty.
But another of LeWitt's apothegms, "Any idea that is better stated in two dimensions should not be in three dimensions," does not apply to Mancuska's artwork and suggests a measure of his achievement: The sculptural presence of True Story dramatizes the oft-overlooked physical aspect of the activity of reading and stages a memorable confrontation between the two-dimensionality of words and the three-dimensionality of lived experience.
ii and iii), he next turns to the awkward task of distinguishing proverbs from related forms of discourse: aphorisms ("sententiae"), apothegms, gibes ("scommata"), and fables (6) (chap.
67] And in his Apothegms (1531) Erasmus maintains that when Socrates urged his followers to flee carnal pleasures as they would the Sirens, the ancient philosopher was alluding "to Ulysses, who sailed past the Sirens with his ears stopped with wax.
One of Nietzsche's most famous apothegms goes something like this: Don't stare too long into the abyss or the abyss might stare back into you.
But Erasmus lived in an age fond of maxims--aphorisms, paradoxes, mottoes (imprese, devises), similes, apothegms, adages, and more--an age which saw the rise of the emblem mania.